Ancient Roman FAQs

Pales Crigger

Writing

Romans had a way to write things down although they didn't the way we do today. For paper they used the papyrus tree to make it. To write, they had a quill that they dipped in ink. This was the primary writing tool of Ancient Romans.

Family

Roman families were assembled differently than modern families were. Romans included everyone in their household as family, including slaves. The father had ultimate authority over everyone in the family. Some examples that prove this is whenever women had babies, the father got to choose whether or not to keep it, and if a man and woman got divorced the father got custody of their child.

Names

Because the father had ultimate authority, the children didn't get named until the father decided to keep it, sometimes this took up to 8 or 9 days because the children's survival rate was low. All men had at least 2 names, but sometimes it could be more like a nickname or trophy name. Women's names were very simple, they only had a first name which came from their gens.

Men's clothing

Romans inherited their clothing from Etruscan people. Roman garments were very complicated, they sometimes had several pieces of fabric sewn together. The basic garments of clothing was a Tunic which included a belt. The tunic normally reached men's calves. Some colors and designs were designated for certain social classes, for example the emperor was the only person allowed to wear purple. Men were only allowed to wear one type of jewelry, a personalized signet ring that was used for keys or impressions. Although, male children were allowed to wear a locket that contained an amulet to chase of evil spirits

Women's clothing

Freeborn girls wore the same costume as freeborn boys. Which included a toga worn over a tunic but it was looser than boys were. It protected the wearer against the evil eye or other unseen dangers that may attack them. Their hair was worn combed carefully, braided, and then tied back with a fillet. Once women reached puberty they took off their toga which symbolized she was ready for marriage.

Citations

“Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Suzanne Dixon, The Roman Family (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992).

Beryl Rawson, ed., The Family in Ancient Rome: New Perspectives (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1986).

Paul Veyne, ed., From Pagan Rome to Byzantium, volume 1, in A History of Private Lives, edited by Philippe Ariès and Georges Duby (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1987).

Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&dviSelectedPage=&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&zid=&search_within_results=&p=WHIC%3AUHIC&action=e&catId=&activity&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX3028100543&source=Bookmark&u=va_s_128_0610&jsid=6544ea16e968217c429d48b8d8773c74

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&dviSelectedPage=&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&zid=&search_within_results=&p=WHIC%3AUHIC&action=e&catId=&activity&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX3034800189&source=Bookmark&u=va_s_128_0610&jsid=

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&search_within_results=&p=WHIC%3AUHIC&action=e&catId=&activity&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX3427400232&source=Bookmark&u=va_s_128_0610&jsid=880dc663683fce489865ae3d22862026

"Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&dviSelectedPage=&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&zid=&search_within_results=&p=WHIC%3AUHIC&action=e&catId=&activity&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX2897200107&source=Bookmark&u=va_s_128_0610&jsid=e7890f29026c24c1554d0a2d1ca571d4

http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/clothing.html