WEATHER

By:Briana Bell

Hurricanes

Hurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere.
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Tornadoes

As the ground temperature increases, moist air heats then starts to rise. When the warm, moist air meets cold dry air, it explodes in an upward direction, puncturing the layer above.
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Hail

Hail is formed when extremely strong thunderstorm updrafts meet supercooled water droplets.
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Wildfires

As many as 90 percent of wildland fires in the US are caused by humans. Some human-caused fires result from campfires left unattended, the burning of debris, negligently discarded cigarettes and intentional acts of arson. The remaining 10 percent are started by lightning or lava.
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Drought

Droughts are caused by failure of precipitation.
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Avalanche

Avalanches occur due to any triggers such as: overloading, temperature, slope angle, snow pack conditions, and vibration. Overloading is an important trigger, the weight of the snow increases until it overcomes cohesion to the snow pack underneath.
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Snow

The more water vapor there is available to the cloud, and the stronger the updrafts that cause this water vapor to condense into cloud water or ice particles, the more likely it is that snow will form within the cloud, and that the snowfall accumulation could be large.
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Typhoons

A pre-existing disturbance, warm ocean water, low atmospheric stability, sufficient Coriolis force, moist mid-atmosphere, and upper atmosphere divergence are all important factors for typhoon formation.
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Blizzard

For a blizzard to form, warm air must rise over cold air.
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Rainy

The ground warms up, causing moisture in the ground to evaporate and rise, and the hot ground also heats the air above it. As the water vapour rises, it cools and condenses into clouds and eventually rain.
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Sources:

www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/sevweath/swhoware.html

downloads.bbc.co.uk/news/nol/.../tornado/.../how_tornado_is_formed.pdf

www.wunderground.com/resources/severe/hail.asp

www.nps.gov/fire/wildland.../wildfire-causes.cfm

www.n-d-a.org/avalanche.php

www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_snow.htm

https://www.tropicalweather.net/what-causes-typhoons.html

https://eo.ucar.edu/kids/dangerwx/blizzard3.htm

www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/rain/why-does-it-rain