Community supported Agriculture

by: Su hyun Cho

What is CSA?

-CSA Stands for Community Supported Agriculture.

-CSA allows city residents to have direct access to high quality, fresh produce grown locally by regional farmers.

-Weekly or bi-weekly, from June until October or November, your farmer will deliver that share of produce to a convenient drop-off location in your neighborhood.

- They Share usually include 7-10 types of vegetables, enough for a family of 2-3 people.

-When you join a CSA, you sign up for regular deliveries of fresh fruits, vegetables, and in some cases meat and dairy from the participating farms.

-Many CSAs also offer the option of other produce from local farms. For a few extra dollars a week, in addition to your vegetables, you can add fruit, eggs, meat, and even flowers to your order.

Benefits of CSA

1)Ultra-fresh, locally grown produce.

This is by far the number one reason for participating in CSA. Farms give their members the very best of their produce, and many even offer flowers, honey, eggs, and more.


2)Access to special buys

Farms often offer seasonal deals to their CSA members. Boxes of tomatoes to can, a neighbor farmer's grass-fed beef, a chance to get flats of strawberries at the end of the season so they can clear the field.


3)Saves money

most CSA members will save money over a similar amount of quality produce bought at the store or from a farmers market.


4)Special events at the farm

U-pick events, barbecues, pot lucks, farm tours, and more. Different farms handle public events differently, from full-on harvest festivals with bands and dancing to more modest farm tours, but these special events are a great bonus prize of CSA membership.


Advantages for farmers:

-They can Receive payment early in the season, which helps with the farm's cash flow.

-They will Have an opportunity to get to know the people who eat the food they grow


Advantages for consumers:

- They can Eat ultra-fresh food, with all the flavor and vitamin benefits

-Get exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking

-Develop a relationship with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grown

References

-What is CSA?. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.justfood.org/csa>.

-Watson, Molly. Benefits of Community Supported Agriculture. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. http://localfoods.about.com/od/csa1/tp/Benefits-Of-Community-Supported-Agriculture.htm.

-Brooks, Leif. What is CSA?. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://lifehacker.com/5819320/community-supported-agriculture-what-it-is-and-why-you-should-join>.