Asiatic Lions

Asiatic Lion Facts...

The Asiatic lion is one of the sub-species of lions. It's body length, not including the tail, ranges from 200 to 280 centimeters. Its tail ranges from 60 to 90 centimeters long. Its height is 90 centimeters and its weight is most commonly 200 to 275 kilograms. An Asiatic lions diet consists of nilgai, chital, sambhar, goats, buffaloes and occasionally smaller animals. Also, its weight is often in between 300 and 500 lbs.

Did You Know?

Lions have been a symbol of power in India for many years.
This picture shows what a grown male Asiatic lion looks like.

An Endangered Species...

The Asiatic Lion has become extinct from its range of habitats except in a small part of India called Gir. This sub-species of lions is highly endangered. In 1936 it was believed there were about 287 lions living that were known. As of 2005, there were 359 lions in a protected sanctuary. The time when there was the least amount of Asiatic lions was in 1968 when there was only 177 lions. In 2010, there were about 410 Asiatic lions.

Lions habitat...

Since the Asiatic lion is a highly endangered species, they live in a protected sanctuary. This sanctuary is located in the Gir forest in India. Most of these lions are found in the Gir Forest National Park. This Park is also a 560 mile sanctuary for the Asiatic Lions. Also, about 200 of these lions live in zoos.

Did You Know?

Asiatic lion males often travel alone or sometimes with another male.
This is a map that displays the Asiatic lions habitat in India.

Works Cited/Bibliography


http://www.asiaticlion.org/asiatic-lion-history.htm

Wildlife Conservation Trust. “Asiatic Lion History.”

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0106/feature3/

Klum, Mattias. “Asia’s Last Lions” NationalGeographic.com

http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/teacher_resources/best_place_species/current_top_10/asiatic_lion_.cfm

Harvey, Martian “Asiatic Lion” World Wildlife Fund WWF.org

http://www.lionsofgir.com/the-gir-forest/

The Lions of Gir Foundation. “The Lions of the Gir Forest”