VOTING

ALL ABOUT

By Haley Kyzer

REGISTRATION

Depending on the state you live in, you may be or may not be required to register in order to vote. the reason behind why people are required to register is to prevent voter fraud, which is an illegal interference with the process of an election. Acts of fraud affect vote counts to bring about an election result, whether by increasing the vote share of the favored candidate, depressing the vote share of the rival candidates, or both.

REQUIREMENTS

There are three main requirements to register to vote

  • you must be at least 18 years of age
  • you must be a resident of the state in which you are voting in
  • you must be a U.S citizen.

STEPS

  1. Fill out all of the information on the voter registration form. The form asks for your address and date of birth, and some request your party affiliation. It will also ask for proof of identity, such as a Social Security Number or driver's license number, and it will have a space for a signature.
  2. Mail the voter registration or take it to your local voter registration office.
  3. look for a registration card in two to four weeks. If you do not receive such a card, contact your county clerk or registrar of voters to make sure that you are listed on the rolls.

WHERE?

You may be able to apply to register to vote in person at the following public facilities:

  • State or local voter registration and/or election offices
  • The department of motor vehicles
  • Public assistance agencies
  • Armed services recruitment centers
  • State-funded programs that serve people with disabilities
  • Any public facility that a state has designated as a voter registration agency

STEPS IN VOTING

Voting is a method for a group such as a meeting or an electorate to make a decision or express an opinion—often following discussions, debates, or election campaigns. Democracies elect holders of high office by voting.

A vote is a formal expression of an individual's choice in voting, for or against some motion or against some ballot question, for a certain candidate, a selection of candidates, or a political party.

1) PREPARING TO VOTE
  • Find out if you're eligible to vote in the next election.
  • Find out if you're already registered.
  • Register to vote.
  • Learn where your polling place is.
  • Obtain a sample ballot.
  • Educate yourself on the candidates and the issues.
2) VOTING ON SITE
  • Go to your polling place.
  • Fill out the ballot as you wish.
  • Review your ballot.
  • turn it in.

3) OR ABSENTEE AND EARLY VOTING

  • Apply in writing to your city election commission.
  • Wait for your ballot to arrive.
  • Fill out your ballot.
  • Place the small envelope into the bigger envelope.
  • mail it to the designated destination.

VOTER BEHAVIOR

Voting behavior is a form of political behavior. Understanding voters' behavior can explain how and why decisions were made either by public decision-makers, which has been a central concern for political scientists, or by the electorate.
WHO VOTES AND WHO DOESN'T VOTE, WHY?

  • people who vote are mainly citizens who are middle aged. people who do vote usually vote because they have a positive attitude towards government and citizenship. Also because they care about who is running their country and they want to voice their opinion on this factor.
  • people who don't vote are mainly younger citizens. People not voting is usually caused by them not being qualified to register, not registering, or apathy (lack of interest). one other reason might be because they don't think they are educated enough about the candidates. those are just 4 reasons why people don't vote, there are many other reasons.

STRAIGHT VS SPLIT TICKET VOTING

  • straight ticket voting is when you only vote for candidates in one political party.
  • split ticket voting is when you choose candidates from one party and some from another

BALLOT FATIGUE

  • Ballot fatigue is when there are several names on a political ballot, and voters choose to ignore some candidates when there are too many choices. Usually what happens is voters get tired of reading all the names on the ballot and end up picking the ones who they recognize that are closer to the top of the ballot.
  • the only way to prevent this is to make sure there are few names on the ballot, and not too many.

AMENDMENTS THAT CHANGED VOTING HISTORY

The amendments that had the most major effects with changing voting rules are the 15th,17th, 19th, 23rd, 24th, and 26th Amendments
15TH AMENDMENT

  • the 15th amendment granted African American men the right to vote by saying that the "right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude."

17TH AMENDMENT

  • the 17th amendment established direct election of United States Senators by popular vote. The amendment overrides Article I, section 3, Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which senators were elected by state legislatures.

19TH AMENDMENT(1920)

  • the 19th amendment prohibits any United States citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex, therefor now giving woman the right to vote.

23RD AMENDMENT

  • extends the right to vote in the presidential election to citizens residing in the District of Columbia by granting the District electors in the Electoral College, as if it were a state. The amendment was proposed by the 86th Congress on June 16, 1960, and ratified by the states on March 29, 1961.

24TH AMENDMENT

  • On January 23, 1964, the United States ratified the 24th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting any poll tax in elections for federal officials. (Many Southern states adopted a poll tax in the late 1800s. This meant that even though the 15th Amendment gave former slaves the right to vote, many poor people, both blacks and whites, did not have enough money to vote.)

26TH AMENDMENT

  • prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right of US citizens, eighteen years of age or older, to vote on account of age. The drive to lower the voting age from 21 to 18 grew across the country during the 1960s, driven in large part by the broader student activism movement protesting the Vietnam War.

TIMELINE OF THE HISTORY OF SUFFERAGE

suffrage is the right to vote in political elections.

1924

congressional act; all native Americans given citizenship

1944

smith vs. allwright; supreme court rules prohibiting African Americans from voting in primary elections is unconstitutional.

1957

civil rights act of 1957; justice department can sue to protect voting rights in various states

1660

civil rights act of 1960; introduces penalties against anybody who obstructs an individuals voting rights.

1965

voting acts right of 1965; literacy test prohibited;federal voters registrars authorized in 7 southern states

1992

voting rights language assistance act; Extends use if bilingual ballots and voting assistance.

1993

national voter registration act; voting rights language assistance act; makes it easier to register to vote and maintain registration.