Hot Seat

Literacy Strategy #18 By: Alexandra Kimball

What is Hot Seat??

Hot seat is a role-playing activity that builds students' comprehension. During this activity a student will assume the persona of a character within a story they have read, then sit in a chair designated as the "Hot Seat" and they will be interviewed by their classmates. The reason it is called hot seat is because the student has to think quickly and answer in a way that conveys the character they are acting as.

Used in grade levels 3-5 and 6-8

Instrucitonal Focus

  • Oral Language
  • Comprehension
  • Content Areas

Why should this be used??

When students participate in the hot seat activity, they deepen their understanding of what they are reading. This strategy develops the students ability to think on their feet, refines their oral language skills, and improves their question asking skills.
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When should this be used??

Hot seat should be used either during the reading of a book or after and you can make small groups or do it in a whole group setting. Certain students are chosen to be in the hot seat and assume the role of their character. Each student who is going to be in the hot seat will get their own turn to be interviewed.

Steps:

1. Learn about the character
2. Create a costume
3. Prepare opening remarks
4. Introduce the character
5. Ask questions and make comments
6. Summarize the ideas

Common Core State Standards:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.3
Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.4
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

Additional Resources

Audrey in the Hot Seat as Goldilocks after a Read Aloud

Resource citations

Carlscorner.us.com,. (2016). to Comprehension Corner. Retrieved 2 March 2016, from http://www.carlscorner.us.com/comprehension.htm


Education.com,. (2016). Comprehension Building Activity | Education.com. Retrieved 2 March 2016, from http://www.education.com/reference/article/comprehension-building-activity/


Thinkinghistory.co.uk,. (2016). voictoall.com. Retrieved 2 March 2016, from http://www.thinkinghistory.co.uk/ActivityModel/ActModHotSeat.html


Tompkins, G. E. (2012). 50 Literacy Strategies: Step-by-Step (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River: Pearson.


YouTube,. (2016). Audrey in the Hot Seat as Goldilocks after a Read Aloud. Retrieved 2 March 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2dId0rlrMs