Unit 2 HTRLLAP

By: Laura Taylor

Chapter 21: Marked for Greatness

Harry Potter’s lightning shaped scar was caused by Lord Voldemort trying to murder Potter by using the Killing Curse but the Killing Curse backfired and nearly killed Voldemort in the process. Physical imperfections are marks and greatness or evil in literature and Harry’s scar symbolizes his greatness in the shape of a lightning bolt. Lightning bolts symbolize primal emotion, holiness, and power. Potter survived the Killing Curse because of his mother’s love, the primal emotion that is found in lightning due to its raw power and ferocity. Potter can be thought of as holy is because he effectively defeats death by avoiding the Killing Curse. Potter is above death, even later when he is destroying the horcrux inside of him he doesn't die, showing his holiness. The power inside lightning is shown in Potter by his ability to destroy the undefeatable, Voldemort. In Frankenstein, the creature is built from many different bodies and stitched together into a giant horrific creature. The piecing together of many different body parts in such a crude manner suggest that the creature is unfinished in some way. Frankenstein created the monster without a thought of of how the scarring on the creature’s body would affect how other people would view the creature. The scarring across his body show how the craters is cracked and broken and is missing something inside of himself. The scars’ unfinishedness is shown through the violent murders the creature commits and his lack of understanding of why those were so immoral.
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Fig. 1. Krumbholz, Mathias. Lightning Pritzerbe 01 (MK). Digital image.Wikimedia Commons. N.p., 24 Sept. 2010. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.

Chapter 22: He’s Blind for a Reason, You Know

In the movie, The Book of Eli, we find out at the end that Eli is actually blind. When Eli reaches the west coast to deliver the Bible that was stolen from him, we see that his eye are clouded over and he cannot see. The blindness shows why he was chosen to deviled the Bible. Eli, while being blind to the world around him, has the ability to communicate with God, as he is told by a voice to deliver the Bible to the west coast. His blindness isn't displayed until the end of the movie, explaining all at once why he could survive being attacked and shot at by multiple people at once. Throughout the movie is appears that he is being protected by some supernatural force as he is able to life through situations that should've killed him. His blindness is a testament to his ability to communicate with God and the protection he got from God until he can deliver the bible got the west coast, where a group of people are collecting classic literature. The theme is belief in the movie and Eli’s blindness shows how even a person who is disabled can completely incredible feats if they believe.
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Fig. 2. Lee, Pak Sang. A Man, 30-40 Years Old, Blind Due to Onchocerciasis. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 2004. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.

Chapter 23: It’s Never Just Heart Disease... Chapter 24: ...And Rarely Just Illness

In Pixar’s Up, the wife of Carl Fredricksen, Ellie, dies from an unknown illness when she and Carl were both old. Ellie collapses while out on a picnic with Carl and the last we see her alive, she is in a hospital bed. Her death is sudden and beautiful as when we see her in the hospital bed she looks the same as she did when she was healthy. It was mysterious in origin, as we the viewers don't know why she suddenly collapsed or what the illness even was. Her death came right before Carl was going to show her the tickets to South America in order to complete their life long dream. Carl is understandably upset and depressed by his wife’s death. Her death was orchestrated to drive Carl into a cranky, sad old man that only wants to be closer to his wife. His longing for his wife eventually leads him to attach thousands of balloons to his house in order to travel to the place that his wife and him had always want to travel to. By doing so, he feels closer to his wife. While his life with his wife was a less than ten minute segment, it was used effectively to show what drives Carl to take the extreme measures he did to visit a place.

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Fig. 3. Carl & Ellie. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 27 May 2009. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.

Chapter 25: Don’t Read with Your Eyes

“Everyone loved Elizabeth. The passionate and almost reverential attachment with which all regarded her became, while I shared it, my pride and my delight. On the evening previous to her being brought to my home, my mother had said playfully, "I have a pretty present for my Victor—tomorrow he shall have it." And when, on the morrow, she presented Elizabeth to me as her promised gift, I, with childish seriousness, interpreted her words literally and looked upon Elizabeth as mine—mine to protect, love, and cherish. All praises bestowed on her I received as made to a possession of my own. We called each other familiarly by the name of cousin. No word, no expression could body forth the kind of relation in which she stood to me—my more than sister, since till death she was to be mine only” (Shelley 50-51).
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Fig. 4. Keogh, John. Frankenstein. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 1 Nov. 2010. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.

A twenty-first century reader looking at this would interpret it as overprotective, overbearing, and a bit sexist that Victor considers Elizabeth to be his only. Victor considers Elizabeth to be a like a present to him, like a young child looks upon a treasured toy. He thinks of her as an object, there only to give him happiness, which is not how a person should be treated. Her beauty and gentleness is what define her to him, which is the traditional, sexist way to view women.


A contemporary reader would view Victor as kind and loving to his adopted sister, doting on her and thinking her of his world. The author assumes that when one reads that Victor thinks of Elizabeth as his only, that the reader finds it romantic and sweet. In the 1800s when this was written, women were thought of more as objects than actual people and so his idolism of her would be considered loving. The author also assumes that the reader would understand that their future marriage was not out of the norm, as people married their relatives into the nineteenth century. Her being adopted and raised to become Victor’s wife was not an unusual occurrence at the time and his sole desire to be with her actually made him a better man than most men of the time.

Works Cited

Carl & Ellie. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 27 May 2009. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.


Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. New York: HarperCollins E, 2003. EPubBud. 2010. Web. 25 Sept. 2015.


Keogh, John. Frankenstein. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 1 Nov. 2010. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.


Krumbholz, Mathias. Lightning Pritzerbe 01 (MK). Digital image.Wikimedia Commons. N.p., 24 Sept. 2010. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.


Lee, Pak Sang. A Man, 30-40 Years Old, Blind Due to Onchocerciasis. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 2004. Web. 8 Nov. 2015.


Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. Frankenstein. Charlottesville: U of Virginia Library, 1996. Print.