PROTECTING THE YANGTZE

Josh Jamison | Kevin Yuan | Nicole Valdez

Yunnan Lake Newt (Extinct)

Hypselotriton wolterstorffi

  • Species habitat

    • Kunming Lake and surrounding areas

    • Shallow lakes, ponds, marshes

    • Terrestrial and freshwater

  • Species ecological roles

    • Newts often serve as bioindicators for an ecosystem because they absorb oxygen and other substances through their skin. They are sensitive to subtle changes in the ph and are therefore a good indication to biologists of pollution and the overall health of the environment.

  • Value

    • They serve as a bioindicator so the loss of these newts means that 1. the ecosystem is in a bad state and 2. we no longer have a bioindicator for this habitat.

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment

    • “habitat destruction and degradation resulting from general pollution, land reclamation, domestic duck farming and the introduction of exotic fish and frog species.”

  • Consequences of the loss of the species

    • Biodiversity is lost in the lakes and rivers. The aesthetic aspect

    • we also lose a good bioindicator of pollution so biologists will have to rely on other species or other methods to track pollution.

Big image

Snow Leopard (Endangered)

Panthera uncia

  • Species habitat

    • Snow leopards live in the mountains of South and Eastern Asia.

    • They live in altitudes above mountainous tree lines during the summer but descend to lower elevations during the winter.

  • Species ecological roles

    • The snow leopard helps regulate the populations of many large animals that inhabit the mountains near the Yangtze River.

    • It also maintains the health of Yangtze inhabitants by eating the weak and sick.

  • Value

    • Snow leopard pelts can be sold for over $7,000 by poachers.

    • The snow leopard is an indicator to the health of their habitat to environmentalists.

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment

    • Poaching for snow leopard pelts is a major threat to their population.

    • Cattle herders kill snow leopards when they attack their livestock.

    • Climate change in the mountains of southern and eastern Asia poses as a threat to the snow leopard, as they have evolved to grow a thick coat of fur to maintain body heat.

  • Consequences of the loss of the species

    • The dwindling number of snow leopards can cause other species to overpopulate. These growing populations will demand more food which will include fish from the river. A smaller amount of fish that reach downstream will affect the populations that depend on them for food, including humans.

  • Rate of loss

    • There are an estimated 4,080-6,590 snow leopards left in both the wild and captivity.

Big image

Chinese Alligator (Improved By Intervention)

Alligator sinensis

  • Species habitat

    • It’s found in the yangtze river as well as the swamps surrounding it. Also has underground burrow areas, and basking areas and nest sites on the ground.

    • Rivers, streams

  • Species ecological roles

    • Because they’re declining they have little impact on the ecosystem and are just large predator animals.

  • Value

    • it’s a precious and rare animal that represent a time before the chinese people took over their habitat

    • Although some fear the chinese alligator because it may attack them, there is no document attacks

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment

    • They are used for alternative medicine such as to treat gallbladders and also used as a food source.

    • Human population resulted in conversions of alligator’s habitat into rice fields.

    • Habitat Loss

  • Consequences of the loss of the species

    • Because we are already facing their loss it would barely have an impact on the ecosystem

  • Rate of loss

    • They are now increasing in population, slowly

Big image

Works Cited

  • "Alligator Sinensis (Chinese Alligator, T'o, Yow Lung, Yangtze Alligator)." Animal Diversity Web. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.


  • "Cynops Wolterstorffi." AmphibiaWeb -- Search Results. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.


  • "Newts." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.

  • "Snow Leopard." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.


  • "Snow Leopard." WorldWildlife.org. World Wildlife Fund, n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.