EveryDay Lives

The day to day activities and goals in the North and South

South's Goal

-http://study.com/academy/lesson/britain-and-france-respond-to-the-american-civil-war.html

Those in the South believed that they were forming their own country and were a legitimate nation. They first had to prove their independence in order to achieve it

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http://www.civilwar.org/resources/confederate-states-had-many.html?

Confederate States of America only had to do enough damage to the invading army that its troops lost morale and politicians in Washington lost the popular support and political will to continue fighting.

North's Goal

http://www.civilwar.org/resources/confederate-states-had-many.html?

His goal was to preserve the entirety of the United States, which could only be done by an all out defeat of and total surrender by the South. To accomplish this, the Federals had to stage a successful invasion and occupation of the South, never an easy task.

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Southern Problems

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/civilwar/southwar/

Most of the fighting during the American Civil War took place on Southern soil. Union forces had to conquer the South in order to win the war. War action around their homes created many hardships for Southerners.

Arnold, James R., and Roberta Wiener. Life Goes On: The Civil War at Home, 1861-1865. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 2002. Print.

Bloody fighting and destruction came to southern towns and farms

http://www.ushistory.org/us/33b.asp

The South could produce all the food it needed, though transporting it to soldiers and civilians was a major problem.

Arnold, James R., and Roberta Wiener. Life Goes On: The Civil War at Home, 1861-1865. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 2002. Print.

The Confederate military also took about 40,000 slaves away from plantations to use as laborers and servants.

North's Problems

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/civilwar/northwar/

From time to time, Confederate cavalry raided into the North to bring the war home to Northerners and, they hoped, to influence Northern morale and support for the war.

http://www.shmoop.com/civil-war/society.html

Farms were without men to till the soil and factories were left with few workers. However, demands for food and goods increased as the armies ate their way through the war.

Southern Support

Arnold, James R., and Roberta Wiener. Life Goes On: The Civil War at Home, 1861-1865. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 2002. Print.

The people left behind struggled to feed their families and to supply food to the confederate army
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Northern Support

http://www.shmoop.com/civil-war/society.html

For instance, women made bandages from lint, nursed wounded men back to health

Arnold, James R., and Roberta Wiener. Life Goes On: The Civil War at Home, 1861-1865. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 2002. Print.

Once the Civil War began the north bought more machines and hired more workers to supply homes and the soilders with every thing they needed