Integrating Art in Education

AnneMarie Alfieri

Agenda

1. Introduction

2. Icebreaker

3. Five Reasons for Integrating Art

4. Activity: Discover your art style

5. Analyze Art in Math

6. Analyze Art in Science

7. Analyze Art in English

8. Analyze Art in Social Studies

9. How does integrating art enhance critical thinking skills?

10. Evaluation

Icebreaker: Lost Inside A Painting

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"The Persistence of Memory" Salvador Dali, 1931

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"Evening on Karl John" Edvard Munch, 1892

Questions for thought about the above pictures.

1. What is going on around you? What do you see? hear? smell? taste? and feel?


2. What are you going to do being lost inside this painting? Are you going to stay? Are you going to try to get out? Why?

5 Reasons for Integrating Art in Education

1. Perception: perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas

2. Reasoning: citing evidence that supports your response

3. Questioning and Investigating: using prompts to spark observations and inquiry. Not just who, what, when, where, how, and why? Also I see, I wonder, and I feel.

4. Comparing and Connecting New Ideas: Build on prior knowledge by connecting, extending, or challenging ideas

5. Finding Complexity: Uncover multiple dimensions and layers

Math and Art

Concepts

Space and Form; Linear Perspective; Scale; Length; Balance; Overlapping; Spatial Distortion; Foreshortening; Distance



Suggested Art forms but not limited to…

All Art


Abstract; Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism



Context

“The Charge of the Lancers” -Umberto Boccioni


“The Poplar Avenue” -David Cox

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"The Charge of the Lancers" Umberto Boccioni, 1915

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"The Poplar Avenue" David Cox, 1820

Science and Art


Concepts

Media; Lighting; Shading; Color; Pigment; Techniques; Texture; Sculpture (Rocks and Minerals); Composition



Suggested Art forms but not limited to…

All Art


Bronze Age, Gothic Stained Glass, Renaissance Frescoes; Romanticism; Sculptures



Context

“Dancers” - Edgar Degas


“The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolas Tulp” - Rembrandt

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"Dancers" Edgar Degas, 1899 (pastel on paper)

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"The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolas Tulp" Rembrandt, 1632

English and Art

Concepts

Symbolism; Myth; Relationships; Genre; Rhythm; Plot



Suggested Art forms but not limited to…

All Art


Impressionism, Realism, Symbolism, Classicism, Neo-Classicism


Context

Pierre Auguste Renoir “The Luncheon of the Boating Party” 1881


Yan Van Eycke“The Arnolfini Portrait” 1434

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"The Luncheon of the Boating Party" Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1881

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"The Arnolfini Portrait" Jan Van Eyck, 1434

Social Studies and Art

Concepts

Plot; History; Movements; Ideology; Politics; Reform; Persuasiveness; Drama; Conflict



Suggested Art forms but not limited to…

All Art


Classicism, Neo-Classicism, Renaissance; Baroque; Rococo; Romanticism; Realism; Impressionism; Modern



Context

Jacques-Louis David “The Death of Socrates” 1787


Timeline from 1290-1950

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"The Death of Socrates" Jacques-Louis David, 1787

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"Madonna Enthroned" Ciambue, 1290

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"The Ambassadors" Hans Holbein, 1533

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"Louis XIV" Hyancinthe Rigaud, 1701

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"The Stone Breakers" Gustave Courbet, 1849

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"Young Woman Sewing" Mary Cassatt, 1882

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"The Starry Night" Vincent Van Gogh, 1889

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"Autumn Rhythm" Jackson Pollock, 1950

How does integrating art enhance critical thinking skills?

~ multiple perspectives

~ reasoning and evidence

~ deeper questioning and inquiry

~ investigation

~ observation

~ comparing and connecting new and known ideas

~ complexity