Sweatshops of Nike

Harsh Working Conditions

Where are Nike sweatshops located?

After many years of criticism over Nike's sweatshops, they released their locations as China, Thailand, South Korea, and Vietnam. These are the main factories and are where most of the products are made. Other places include Australia, Canada, Italy, Mexico, Turkey, and the United States.

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What are the products made in these sweatshops?

The apparel part of Nike is most known for using sweatshop labor. The apparel worker wages are the lowest among people that work for Nike. The other product made in sweatshops include shoes.
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What are the conditions of Nike sweatshops?

On average, across the world, the ordinary sweatshop worker makes 91 cents an hour. Most people who work at Nike sweatshops work 60-70 hours a week and 6 days. If they work like those hours and days per week, their income exceeds the average income across the world. They receive no working benefits from this company. In 1997, a plant in Ho Chi Minh City went under inspection and found that it had carcinogen levels that exceeded local standards. 77% of its employs suffered from respiratory problems. At this same site, workers were forced to work 65 hours a week and made 10 dollars a week. Other Nike plants have received complaints from hot temperatures and lots of noise! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9a_D-azUogg
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How did the Industrial Revolution affect working conditions today?

The Industrial Revolution made working conditions way better then the way they were in the late 1700's. The harsh working conditions brought attention to the sweatshops which forced owners to improve working conditions. Today workers are given benefits and are limited to working certain hours a week. After EXTENSIVE research, I found out that sweatshops are a good thing in foreign countries which employ many people jobs even though the harsh working conditions that surround them. The one main thing I learned is sweatshops are good. Not because of the harsh working conditions, but the opportunity it provides.

Am I more concerned with how the products I buy are made?

I am not really concerned with how the products I buy are made but more the less concerned for the people making the products. It will not stop me from buying from Nike but it does bother me that they use sweatshops.
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Resources

Greenhouse, S. (1997, November 7). Nike Shoe Plant in Vietnam Is Called Unsafe for Workers. Retrieved January 14, 2016, from http://www.nytimes.com/1997/11/08/business/nike-shoe-plant-in-vietnam-is-called-unsafe-for-workers.html


Sweatshop. Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia [serial online]. 2015;:1p. 1. Available from: Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia, Ipswich, MA. Accessed January 14, 2016


Kates M. The Ethics of Sweatshops and the Limits of Choice. Business Ethics Quarterly [serial online]. April 2015;25(2):191-212. Available from: Business Source Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed January 14, 2016.


Mouritsen J. Discussion of 'Accounting and Sweatshops: Enabling Coordination and Control in Low-Price Apparel Production Chains'. Contemporary Accounting Research [serial online]. Summer2014 2014;31(2):347-353. Available from: Business Source Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed January 14, 2016


Greenhouse, S. (1997, November 7). Nike Shoe Plant in Vietnam Is Called Unsafe for Workers. Retrieved January 14, 2016, from http://www.nytimes.com/1997/11/08/business/nike-shoe-plant-in-vietnam-is-called-unsafe-for-workers.html