GATE Goodies

GATE Thoughts & Happenings - June 2021

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Summer Enrichment Ideas

We all know that those summer hours are a gift, but sometimes they just drag!

Here are some ideas on keeping those active GATE minds busy and keeping your gifted learner(s) growing with meaningful activities...

Nature Math

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Why not head outside and explore the Redwood Grove in Carbon Canyon Park or any other woods/forest?


Maybe you can find tree stumps to count the rings and estimate the trees age.

Measure the diameter and circumference of the tree stump and compare to the approximate age of the tree.


Can't find tree stumps? Why not measure the diameter and circumference of some of the trees and estimate the tree's height?


This is not only an exploration of real life math skills, but a dive into natural science as well!


Or just go outside and get your kids moving:

How many miles will you and the kids walk this summer? Set a goal, then download a free pedometer app to your phone and let the kids graph and track your mileage.


Calculate the distance between your home and somewhere your kids would really like to go this summer. Can you walk that many miles during the summer?


It is not unreasonable to walk 3 miles per day, so a goal of some place 100 miles away is very doable. Then actually take a day to drive there and enjoy once you and the kids have reached your goal!

Science: Fizzing Lemonade!

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Who doesn't love a tall glass of cold lemonade on a Summer's day?


Why not make your own lemonade from scratch and turn it into a science experiment at the same time?


All you need to create fizz is to combine an acid and a base. Simple enough!

You will be creating a chemical reaction producing carbon dioxide (those tiny bubbles!)


Here's what you will need:

1 - 2 lemons

1 tsp baking soda

cold water (at least the same amount as you have lemon juice)

1 - 2 tsp sugar (to taste)

juicer

glass

spoon

measuring spoon


Squeeze and strain the juice of one lemon into a glass.

Add one tsp baking soda

Give it a good stir to get the chemical reaction

Add sugar to the water and stir well, then add to the lemon mixture. (You will see more reaction, but not as much as the initial reaction. Why do you think that is?)

Drink up! How does the lemonade feel on your tongue?


Extensions:

Have your child develop a hypothesis before you start.

Have your child determine which ingredient is the acid and which is the base.

Have your child write or draw or about the steps they took and the results they got in this experiment.


More science activities



Edible science from around the web

Social Studies: Cartography!

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Summer is a great time to develop map making skills!


You should probably start small and close to home.


  • Maybe your child can create a map of his/her room and all of the furniture inside.
  • Try a map of the entire house, including furniture.
  • Expand your child's map making skills by moving on to create a map of your neighborhood or favorite location. (Then take a drive and check the map for accuracy)
  • Don't forget to label furniture and include a key!


Want more map fun? Try some of these...

Mensa for Kids Excellence in Reading

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To encourage the joy of reading, the Mensa for Kids Foundation has developed this Excellence in Reading Program. Kids can earn a commemorative certificate in recognition of their outstanding achievement and get an Excellence in Reading T-shirt, too!


Here's the link for more information:

https://www.mensaforkids.org/achieve/excellence-in-reading/

Other Great Resources for Summer Enrichment

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 Genealogy. Check out the free familysearch.org site to get started on this hobby, which is quickly becoming the number-one hobby in the world.


 Zentangle®. Focused, patterned “doodling” is one way to describe this art form you can learn in ten minutes and spend a lifetime mastering (see image to the right). Check it out at zentangle.com. Easy, eminently portable, and very few supplies necessary = ideal for kids.


 Computers. Have a budding computer programmer? Use this free site where kids can learn to code: codecademy.com. It’s really quite cool.


 Postcards. Postcrossing.com allows anyone to receive postcards (paper, not e-cards) from around the world. You request an address, mail the postcard to that address, and then you get a postcard from another one of the more than 300,000 members. When you receive the card, you register it, and then you start over!