David Wiesner

Author and Illustrator

Central Idea

On February 5, 1956, in suburban New Jersey, David Wiesner was born. As a child, he was often known as ‘the kid who could draw’. He went to the Rhode Island School of Design, where he soon found out that picture books would be the best place for his talents.
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Summary of my Research

On February 5, 1956, in suburban New Jersey, David Wiesner was born. As a child, he was often known as ‘the kid who could draw’. He went to the Rhode Island School of Design, where he soon found out that picture books would be the best place for his talents. He has written and illustrated over 11 books, which are “Mr. Wuffles!”, “Art and Max”, “Flotsam”, “The Three Pigs”, “Sector 7”, “June 29, 1999”, “Tuesday”, “Hurricane”, “Free Fall”, “The Loathsome Dragon”, and “Gonna Roll the Bones”. His inspiration for his books are artists such as Michelangelo, Dürer, Leonardo Da Vinci, Rene Magritte, Giorgio de Chirico, and Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech. He also creates wordless books. Wiesner has also had jobs creating covers for Cricket Magazine and illustrating the cover for the sequel of “E.T: The Extraterrestrial”. He currently lives with his family outside of Philidelphia.

Summary of Synthesized Information

Theme: A recurring theme in David Wiesner’s books is you never know what will happen. I think this because of these three reasons. Firstly, in “Flotsam”, the little boy finds all those odd photos at the beach. I don’t think that’s what he planned to happen there. Second, in “The Stranger”, Mr. Bailey runs into the stranger! Definitely not something that he planned out! Thirdly, in “Tuesday”, the man falls asleep and wakes up to see flying frogs! This would not be something you’d expect to happen. This is why the theme of David Wiesner’s books is you never know what will happen.


Tone: I think the tone in David Wiesner’s books is whimsical. I think this because of these three details. In “Flotsam” there are pictures of underwater kingdoms and aquatic life being personified, traits that automatically give whim to something. In “The Stranger”, there is the odd type of ‘magic’ that happens once the stranger is found. Lastly, in “Tuesday”, there are flying frogs. That’s enough said for that. These details prove that the tone in David Wiesner’s books is whimsical.


Writing Style: The writing style David Wiesner uses is wordless with pictures to convey the story. I think he does this because it gives the books some mystery, it makes his books special because not very many books are wordless, and it showcases his spectacular drawing skills instead of focusing on his words.


Characters: The characters David Wiesner uses are mostly anonymous, besides the occasional supporting character. For example, in "Flotsam", his only character is an a little boy. I think he uses these no-name characters because it adds mystery to the book. It also gives you some creativity for you to work with. You can create a characters name and backstory!


Mood: I think the mood in David Wienser's books are serious, confusing, and joyful all at the same time. For example, in "Tuesday", it starts out like any other night, kind of serious or monotonous, but then suddenly the frogs appear and you're like 'Woah! Where did that come from?' and the confusion and childlike joy come over you. ALl of his books have that type of vibe from them.

Books He's Written and Illustrated

Citations

Wiesner, David. "David Wiesner." David Wiesner. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2015.


Wiesner, David. "David Wiesner." David Wiesner. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2015.


"David+wiesner - Google Search." David+wiesner - Google Search. Google, n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2015.


"David Wiesner: The Origin of a Wordless Author." David Wiesner: The Origin of a Wordless Author. Houghton Mifflin Company, n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2015.


"Biography." David Wiesner. Houghton Mifflin Company, n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2015.