DMS Counseling Newsletter

January Self-Care

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American Foundation for Suicide Prevention




Taking Care of Your Mental Health


Right now, many of us are worried about COVID-19 or Coronavirus. We may feel helpless about what will happen or what we can do. When things feel uncertain or when we don’t generally feel safe, it’s normal to feel stressed.

Stress can be a normal reaction, but sometimes it can also take a toll on our mental health. We don’t always know it’s happening. You might feel more on edge than usual, angry, helpless or sad. You might notice that you are more frustrated with others or want to completely avoid any reminders of what is happening. For those of us who already struggle with our mental wellness, we might feel more depressed or less motivated to carry out our daily activities.

It’s important to note that we are not helpless in light of current news events. We can always choose our response. If you are struggling, here are some things you can do to take care of your mental health in the face of uncertainty:
  1. Separate what is in your control from what is not. There are things you can do, and it’s helpful to focus on those. Wash your hands. Remind others to wash theirs. Take your vitamins. Limit your consumption of news (Do you really need to know what is happening on a cruise ship you aren’t on?).
  2. Do what helps you feel a sense of safety. This will be different for everyone, and it’s important not to compare yourself to others. It’s ok if you’ve decided what makes you feel safe is to limit attendance of large social events, but make sure you separate when you are isolating based on potential for sickness versus isolating because it’s part of depression.
  3. Get outside in nature--even if you are avoiding crowds. I took a walk yesterday afternoon in my neighborhood with my daughter. The sun was shining, we got our dose of vitamin D, and it felt good to both get some fresh air and quality time together. Exercise also helps both your physical and mental health.
  4. Challenge yourself to stay in the present. Perhaps your worry is compounding—you are not only thinking about what is currently happening, but also projecting into the future. When you find yourself worrying about something that hasn’t happened, gently bring yourself back to the present moment. Notice the sights, sounds, tastes and other sensory experiences in your immediate moment and name them. Engaging in mindfulness activities is one way to help stay grounded when things feel beyond your control.
  5. Stay connected and reach out if you need more support. Talk to trusted friends about what you are feeling. If you are feeling particularly anxious or if you are struggling with your mental health, it’s ok to reach out to a mental health professional for support. You don’t have to be alone with your worry and it can be comforting to share what you are experiencing with those trained to help.

We are in this together, and help is always available. If you’re feeling alone and struggling, you can also reach out to The Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741 or National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK.



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Tip of the Month: Keep an inspiring quote by your side.


Keep an inspiring quote or picture that you really love by your workspace, your car, or over your fridge. When you feel depleted, frustrated, or overwhelmed look at your quote and remember why it is important to you. Get that little fix to feel re-inspired and ready to face the world.

One Way to Practice Self-Care is to Care for Others

What is for lunch?

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Easy Greek Salad


Prep Time: 10 mins

Cook Time: 5 mins

Total Time: 15 mins


Serves 4

PIN RECIPE PRINT RECIPE


One of our favorite salad recipes! This easy Greek salad recipe is a flavorful, refreshing side dish!


Ingredients


  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano, more for sprinkling
  • ¼ teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 English cucumber, cut lengthwise, seeded, and sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 cups halved cherry tomatoes
  • 5 ounces feta cheese, cut into ½ inch cubes
  • ⅓ cup thinly sliced red onion
  • ⅓ cup pitted Kalamata olives
  • ⅓ cup fresh mint leaves
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Stress Relief Hot Line

6th Fabiana Fischer fabiana.fischer@gcpsk12.org 678-407-7266

7th Alecia Ellison alecia.ellison@gcpsk12.org 678-376-8542

8th Monica Garcia monica.garcia@gcpsk12.org 770-338-4842

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