John Brown

By: Star Clark

Introduction

''John Brown was a Civil War abolitionist born on May 9, 1800. John Brown didn’t believe in being peaceful when ending slavery. Brown did a raid on Harpers Ferry with a group of 21 men. John Brown’s raid was at first successful, but Brown planned for the local slaves to revolt and gain their freedom when they captured the arsenal. The slaves didn’t revolt and help Brown though, and Brown and his men were captured and killed.''

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John Brown's Early Life

''John Brown moved to Kansas with the passing Kansas-Nebraska act of 1854. John Brown and five of his sons had moved to Kansas.'' Brown and his men had later killed five pro-slavery settlers in 1856. John Brown had also lived in North Elba, New York on land that was given to them by philanthropist Gerrit Smith.''

John Brown's Harper Ferry Raid

''John Brown was the leader of the Harper's Ferry Raid.''John Brown had a group of 21 men that participated in the raid on Harper's Ferry. The first part of the raid was successful, but Brown planned that after they captured the arsenal the local slaves would revolt and gain their freedom easily. None of the slaves came to their aid so Brown and his men were quickly captured and killed. Brown was captured and sentenced to death on November second.''

John Brown's Death

''John Brown was executed on December 2, 1859 after he and his men failed to free the slaves during the raid on Harper's Ferry. John Brown was given the chance to surrender but he refused. Robert E. Lee was the leader of the men that captured and killed Brown. After Brown refused to surrender Robert E. Lee's army quickly captured and killed the men inside the building.''
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Conclusion

''John Brown lived a short life before he died, but although he died from using violence that lots of people didn’t believe was right to use he was still remembered by lots of people including other abolitionists. John Brown had faced a lot of financial problems throughout his life, and he had died trying to save slaves from their owners. John Brown is still remembered for what he did or what he tried to do. Although some people didn’t agree with him using violence he is still known.''

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Bibliography


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