Tax Bill - harmful to KBFPC

It will seriously harm nonprofits and the people we serve...

KBFPC is measuring actions made by our Champions

Please notify Catriona after you make your comments, thank you!

What is at stake for KBFPC (and ALL your favorite non-profits)??

Nonprofits in Alaska and throughout the nation have a lot at stake in this week's federal tax reform legislation. The Foraker Group and their colleagues across the country are tracking key provisions of both the House and Senate versions of federal tax reform, and have analyzed their impacts on charitable nonprofits. Now is the time to reach out to Alaska's congressional delegation to ask them to:

1) Protect the current charitable giving incentive. Proposed changes would decrease the number of Americans who itemize on their federal taxes, which could reduce charitable giving by an estimated $30 billion dollars annually. As much as a $15 million annual drop in Alaska!

2) Incorporate a new “Universal Charitable Deduction”. This would allow those who do not itemize and instead claim the standard deduction (most Americans) to deduct their financial gifts to charitable nonprofits on their taxes.

3) Strongly state their opposition to eliminating the Johnson Amendment. The Johnson Amendment protects nonprofits, including churches and houses of worship, from partisan political activity.

For Alaska delegation contact information click here:

a deeper dive into talking points

1) Protect the current charitable giving incentive. Proposed changes would decrease the number of Americans who itemize on their federal taxes, which could reduce charitable giving by an estimated $30 billion dollars annually. A study commissioned by Independent Sector finds:

“The current proposals, which include an increase in the standard deduction and a decrease in the top marginal tax rate, would decrease charitable giving […] by as much as $13.1 billion a year. (4.6 percent).”


2) Incorporate a new “Universal Charitable Deduction”. This would allow those who do not itemize and instead claim the standard deduction (most Americans) to deduct their financial gifts to charitable nonprofits on their taxes. The National Council of Nonprofits recommends we tell our elected officials that


If the standard deduction is to increase significantly, then a non-itemizer, or ‘universal,’ charitable deduction open to all Americans and not just the wealthy should be implemented to continue to encourage Americans to give generously to the missions and work they support.”


3) Strongly state their opposition to eliminating the Johnson Amendment. The Johnson Amendment protects nonprofits, including churches and houses of worship, from partisan political activity.


“Don’t use tax reform to weaken or repeal the Johnson Amendment, which keeps partisan politics out of Alaska's nonprofits, houses of worship, and foundations. I am concerned that efforts to repeal or weaken the Johnson Amendment would harm my community and damage the public’s trust in my organization and many other Alaska nonprofits and churches.”


[Bonus Points]
4) Don't repeal the Estate Tax.
This is also called “The Death Tax” and it affects large inheritances. Its repeal will likely greatly decrease giving to nonprofits.


The best estimates are that the repeal of the estate tax would considerably reduce giving, both during life and at death. We should also be concerned about the repeal of the estate tax from an equity perspective, as it provides an opportunity to tax capital gains and other forms of wealth, legal and illegal, that have escaped taxation […] Finally, if we believe that wealth conveys power, then we should be concerned that the repeal of the estate tax enables further concentrations of income, wealth, and power among those whose greatest accomplishment may have been getting lucky at birth.”

main sources: