WATER FRAME

By: Tiffany Fairchild

In His Shoes...

The inventor of the "water frame" was Richard Arkwright. In 1766, he became acquainted with John Kay, a mechanic and clock maker. They worked together to build a spinning machine, and Arkwright spent virtually every spare minute of his time on the project. Finally they were able to demonstrate the device in the home of a local schoolmaster in Preston.

The need...

Cotton was a common crop in 1769. Esspecially in the south. They had large cotton feilds where slaves would pick cotton. After some time they realized that they needed to find a way to make the string stronger than it was. That's when Richard came in with the Water Frame.

About the model

  • Arkwright's prototype spinner was powered by horses, but in 1771 he perfected a water-powered spinner, hence the name "water frame."
  • consisted of two pairs of rollers that pulled cotton fibers taut and twisted them into a strong, fine thread.
  • produced the first yarn suitable for use as both warp and weft

One of the issues.....

Like many inventors, Arkwright possessed the inspiration but he did not have the experince to build it. In 1768, he drafted the help of two skilled workers, John Kay and Thomas Highs , who built for him the important parts for his spinning machine. Years later, this partnership was the source of legal trouble, as Arkwright sought to enforce his lisense upon a number of competitors in the yarn industry. He eventually lost the lisense for the water frame, but remained a rich and powerful part in that industry.

Importance To Our History

The Water Frame Brought many changes to the way we used cotton. Without it we would have not gotten this far in the clothing industry.

In Conclusion

Like many inventors, Arkwright possessed the inspiration but not the experience to construct his water frame. In 1768, he enlisted the help of two machinists, John Kay (1704-1764) and Thomas Highs (1718-1803), who built him the important parts for his spinning machine. Years later, this partnership was the source of legal trouble, as Arkwright sought to enforce his patents upon a number of competitors in the yarn industry. He eventually lost the patent for the water frame, but remained a rich and powerful player in that industry.

Citations

"Richard Arkwright." Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Student Resources in Context. Web. 3 Feb. 2014.



"Arkwright, spinner." UXL Biographies. Detroit: U*X*L, 2010. Student Resources in Context. Web. 3 Feb. 2014.



"Water frame." World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Student Resources in Context. Web. 3 Feb. 2014



Drawing of Sir Richard Arkwright's Spinning Machine patented 1769 engraved by J.W. Lowry in 1830s



circa 1800: Slaves picking cotton on a plantation.



Water frame by Arkwright 1769 Technology: Textile industry. - Water frame, 1769 developed by Richard Arkwright in England. - Wood engraving, 19th century.


Spinning frame by Arkwright 1769 Technology: Textile industry. - Spinning frame powered by water (water-frame), developed 1769 by Richard Arkwright in England. - Wood eng., C.19th., coloured later.


Cotton. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 4 Feb 2014.