Connections

Cause/Effect and Sequencing

I can describe logical connections show cause and effect relationships and sequence a story.

Cause and Effect

A cause is something that makes something else happen. Out of two events, it is the event that happens first. To determine the cause, ask the question "Why Did it Happen?"

An effect is what happens as a result of the cause. Of two related events, it’s the one that happens second or last. To determine the effect, ask the question "What Happened?"

At times connecting words are used to link the cause and effect. Examples of connecting words are:

because, so, consequently, therefore, due to the fact, since, as a result, the reason for, thus, nevertheless

Examples

Practice

Quiz

Take these 5 question quiz below. Click on the links "Quia-Cause and Effect 1" and "Quia-Cause and Effect 2" below.

How did you do? Are you at a 1, 2, or 3?

Directions

Click on the link below titled "THE NEW ADDITION". Read the passage. Then click "Next Page" and fill out the rest of the chart on a sheet of notebook paper. When your chart is complete, click "Answer Key" at the bottom of the chart to compare your answers.

How did you do? Would you say you are at a 1, 2, or 3?

Assess

Are you ready to show what you know? Read the passage below. Then click on "Sign in - Google Accounts". Answer the cause and effect questions.

Passage

Letter to the Mayor
In 2009, more than 2 thousand children sent letters to the mayor of Chicago. Their teachers asked them to write. They said that the mayor wanted to know what the children thought. He wanted to learn their ideas about Chicago.

The children wrote many different letters. Some wrote about trash. They wanted people to stop littering. Some wrote about streets. They wanted to have safer streets. Some wanted to have more parks. Some wanted more playgrounds. And some wanted to have computers for every students. There were many different ideas.


The mayor read some of the letters. He asked some of the children to come to see him. They went downtown. They went to his office. His office is in a place called City Hall.


They read their letters out loud. The mayor listened. Then he said that the letters were good. They would help him make plans for the city.


When the children left, they were proud. They went back to their schools. They told other children about the mayor. They told their teachers he like the letters. They thanked the teachers for asking them to write the letters.


The newspaper had an article about this event. The same day the children visited, people read about the visit to the mayor. The newspaper printed some of the letters. Parents were proud. So were the children.

Sequence

Every story is made up of a sequence, or series, of events. An example of a event in Cinderella is the arrival of the page to the house with the invitation to the ball.

The way events are ordered to create a story is called the plot. The plot is all of the action of the story.

Practice

Now let's practice sequencing stories. Click on "Test Tutor Level 3: Sequence" below. Answer the questions. Then click on "Crickweb l KS2Literacy". Check your work by clicking "check" at the lower right hand corner of your screen.

How did you do? Do you think you are at a 1, 2, or 3?

Assess

Are you ready to show what you know? Reread the passage below. Then click on "Sign in - Google Accounts". Answer the sequencing questions.

Passage

Letter to the Mayor
In 2009, more than 2 thousand children sent letters to the mayor of Chicago. Their teachers asked them to write. They said that the mayor wanted to know what the children thought. He wanted to learn their ideas about Chicago.

The children wrote many different letters. Some wrote about trash. They wanted people to stop littering. Some wrote about streets. They wanted to have safer streets. Some wanted to have more parks. Some wanted more playgrounds. And some wanted to have computers for every students. There were many different ideas.


The mayor read some of the letters. He asked some of the children to come to see him. They went downtown. They went to his office. His office is in a place called City Hall.


They read their letters out loud. The mayor listened. Then he said that the letters were good. They would help him make plans for the city.


When the children left, they were proud. They went back to their schools. They told other children about the mayor. They told their teachers he like the letters. They thanked the teachers for asking them to write the letters.


The newspaper had an article about this event. The same day the children visited, people read about the visit to the mayor. The newspaper printed some of the letters. Parents were proud. So were the children.