Abolitionist

By: Christina Burdette

William Lloyd Garrison:

Why were they involved in the movement? Letters on Slavery inspired him to help in the anti-slavery movement.

What were their specific views? He was an extremist who demanded immediate freedom. He viewed slavery from the slaves point of view, not the owners.

What groups did they start/belong to? American Anti-Slavery Society was founded by him. Also belonged to American Colonization Society which wanted to transport slaves to west Africa. This was brief though and he eventually apologized. He also formed the New England Anti-Slavery Society.

What works did they publish? He started the newspaper- The Liberator. Was co-editor of the Quaker newspaper and spoke against slavery. The Black List under the Genius was also his writings against it.

What did they achieve in regards to the abolition movement? He rallied a large support group, but also got attacked frequently. He was very prominent in rallying women to fight against slavery. He was known for being radical in wanting immediate freedom for all slaves world wide.


Sojourner Truth:

Why were they involved in the movement? She was an ex-slave driven by deep religious conviction.

What were their specific views? Even in abolitionist circles, some of Truth's opinions were considered radical. She sought political equality for all women, and chastised the abolitionist community for failing to seek civil rights for black women as well as men. She openly expressed concern that the movement would fizzle after achieving victories for black men, leaving both white and black women without suffrage and other key political rights.

What groups did they start/belong to? In 1844, she joined the Northampton Association of Education and Industry in Northampton, Massachusetts. Founded by abolitionists, the organization supported a broad reform agenda including women's rights and pacifism.

What works did they publish? William Lloyd Garrison published her memoirs in 1850 under the title The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave. She is known for her "Ain't I a woman?" Speech.

What did they achieve in regards to the abolition movement? Sojourner Truth is best known for her extemporaneous speech on racial inequalities, "Ain't I a Woman?", delivered at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in 1851. She spoke to large crowds about the subject of abolition along with Harriett Tubman and Frederick Douglas


Frederick Douglas:

Why were they involved in the movement? He was a former fugitive slave. Douglass credited The Columbian Orator with clarifying and defining his views on human rights.

What were their specific views? Saw the United States Constitution as an anti-slavery document. He respected Garrisons ideas.

What groups did they start/belong to? American Anti-Slavery Society

What works did they publish? edited newspaper "The North Star". Wrote 1845 autobiography – "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" which helped advance abolitionist cause. He also wrote in Frederick Douglass Weekly, Frederick Douglass' Paper, Douglass' Monthly and New National Era.

What did they achieve in regards to the abolition movement? He spoke as an educated black man, which had him gain support and respect from important people.


David Walker:

Why were they involved in the movement? He saw brutal slavery acts as a child and was African American himself.

What were their specific views? For slaves to rebel against owners. He was known for his radical views as an abolitionist. He was against American Colonization Society. Walker argued that blacks had to assume responsibility for themselves if they wanted to overcome oppression

What groups did they start/belong to? He did not belong to any organizations.

What works did they publish? "An Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World" a call for black unity and self-help in the fight against oppression and injustice. This inspired slave revolt. He was involved in the Freedom's Journal newspaper out of New York City that spoke against slavery.

What did they achieve in regards to the abolition movement? Boston's leading spokesman against slavery. His book, "Appeal", horrified southern whites initiated laws that forbade blacks to learn to read and banned the distribution of antislavery literature.