.32 caliber Iver-Johnson revolver

President Mckinley shot by, Leon Czolgosz

President Mckinley shot,.

On September 6, 1901 at 4:00 p.m. the doors to the temple of music opened up and in a single file line, the citizens who were waiting to see the president sprawled in...Little did the people know that Mr. Czolgosz was planning on shooting Mr. McKinley. Around 4:07 it was Mr. Czolgosz turn to greet an shake the hand of Mr. McKinley.

Mr. Czolgosz had a handkerchief over the right hand to hide the .32 caliber Iver-Johnson revolver.Everyone around him just thought he had an injury, and so did Mr. McKinley, as Mr. McKinley went to shake Mr. Czolgosz's left hand, Mr Czolgosz brought up his right arm right to Mr. McKinley's chest and shot two fires. surprisingly only one went in his body and tore through his abdomen and tore up the stomach kidneys and pancreas, the other must have bounced of the sternum and then got tucked into his clothing or bounced of the button. After the shots were fired, Mr. Czolgosz was jumped by guards people in line but Mr. McKinley whispered "don't let them, hurt him" or "go easy on him boys"

And then Mr. McKinley was rushed to the hospital, the hospital wasn't prepared for such a surgery..didn't have the right doctors in town at the time, the only well trained doctor was gynecologist Dr. Mathew Mann. the surgery began at 5:20, the doctor couldn't find the remains of the bullet, and knowing he was loosing a massive a amount of blood, sew up what they could. the surgery ended a little before 7:00 p.m.

For several days Mr. McKinley seemed to be getting better. but little did people realize that without the drainage, an infection had built up inside the president. By September 13, it was obvious Mr. McKinley was dying. at 2:15 a.m. on September 14 , 1901 Mr. McKinley died of gangrene.

That afternoon vice president Theodore Roosevelt was sworn in as president. Mr, Czolgosz was found guilty and sentenced to death.


Shooting of Mr. Mckinley

Thursday, June 6th 1901 at 3:30pm

Inside the Temple of Music building at the Exposition.

Mr. McKinley was in for much more of a bargain then he was awaiting for.