The Sun

By: Brady Hoffacker

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Picture of the sun's core. The core is the center where the nuclear reactions consume hydrogen to form helium. These reaction release the energy that ultimatly makes the light. Highly sensitive to temperature and density.


http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2008/10/26/can-you-feel-the-heat-beneath-your-feet/

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Radiation zone or radiativeregion is a layer of a star's interior where energy is primarily transported toward the exterior y means of radiative diffusion and thermal conduction.


http://astro.ic.ac.uk/research/solar-basics

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In the convection zone hot plasma rises, cools as it nears the surface, and fails to be heated and rise again.


http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/interior.shtml

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The photosphere is a star's outer shell from which light is radiated


http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-tricktionary/en/

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The chromosphere is the second of the three main layers in the sun's atmosphere and is roughly 2,000 km deep.


http://www.astro.ufl.edu/~guzman/ast1002/class_notes/Ch9/Ch9.html

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a corona is a aura plasma that surrounds the sun and other celestial bodies.


http://scied.ucar.edu/sun-regions

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sunspots are temporary phenomena on the photosphere of the sun that appear visibly as dark spots compared to surrounding regions.


http://www.weather.gov/fsd/sunspots

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Solar Prominence with images of Jupiter and Earth for size comparison. A prominence is a large, bright, gaseous feature extending outward from the Sun's surface, often in a loop shape. Prominences are anchored to the Sun's surface in the photosphere, and extend outwards into the Sun's corona.


http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/science/solar-prominence.html

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Is a sudden, rapid, and intense variation in brightness.


http://toppixgallery.com/sun-lens-flare-photoshop/

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An aurora, sometimes referred to as a polar light, is a natural light display in the sky, predominantly seen in the high latitude (Arctic and Antarctic) regions.


http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/gallery/aurora-index.html