America Now

By Braden Kreymborg and Dustin East

The bomb should have been dropped

The atomic bombing of Hiroshima on august 6,1945 was the right thing to do. Karl Compton said in his article “ The use of the atomic bomb saved hundreds of thousands—perhaps several millions—of lives, both American and Japanese; that without its use the war would have continued” Which basically is saying that the bomb ended the war. The bomb took place before the invasion that was going to happen on November 1, 1945 which would lead to “50,000 American casualties and several times that number of Japanese casualties...” (Compton). The bomb was a tactical move to destroy war factories and was successful. A lot of Japanese people agree with the idea that he bomb saved more live than it took. It was also much faster then the war that would have take place. Many live were lost but more would have died if the bomb wasn't dropped.

By Braden

The bomb Should not have been dropped

The bomb should not have been dropped. But the attack is only a warning of things to come. If Japan does not surrender, bombs will have to be dropped on her industries, and unfortunately, thousands of civilians lives will be lost. Truman, Harry S. "In Truman's Own Words" (1945). Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001. Regardless of what people may think, I was nervous. I had to get the bomb over the target and detonate it at a certain time. You don't try to think about emotions and what you are doing to the other side. Really, I don't think we knew what kind of damage(it would do). I was told the bomb was the equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT in effect. When we saw, within moments after the bomb exploded, the damage it did took our breath away. Tibbets, Paul. "On Board the Enola Gay" Interview By ALLMILITARY.com (2000). Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001. The streets were crowded as people began their days in offices, shops,schools, and hospitals. Some people on the street stopped to look at the clock on the domed building downtown. They did not know, or had forgotten, that the clock had stopped 3 days earlier at 8:15 a.m. Then, all of the sudden, there was a bright blinding flash of bright yellow light. It was at 8:15 that morning of August 6th that almost every clock in Hiroshima had stopped. The bomb exploded 700 yards above the ground and the people below were vaporized. Nothing was left of the people of the area but the white shadows on the burned, black sidewalks. Komokura, Sumi. "A Survivor's Story." Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001.


Interview with a Japanese P.O.W interviewed by Braden kreymborg

We are interviewing a Japanese Army officer who was a prisoner of war. who was well informed with what the Japanese had planed.


What would have been the next event that would have happened if the bomb was not dropped?


"There would have been an invasion some where around november 1, 1945 on a beach in inner Japan."


would there be a way to stop the invasion?


"The Japanese are known for never giving up but i believe that all the troops would have died fighting till there last breath."


Did the bomb save lives?


"I believe that in the long run the bomb did save many lives. There was around 80,000 deaths at Hiroshima and there was a estimated death count of 50,000 american casualties alone and several time that of japan." (Compton


How long would the war gone on with out the dropping of the bomb?


"I would estimate about 5 to 10 years." (Compton)


There you have it, the truth from a Japanese man and how he saw it.

sources

Compton, Karl T. "If the Atomic Bomb Had Not Been Used." Atlantic Dec. 1946. Web. 10 Nov. 2015.


Komokura, Sumi. "A Survivor's Story." Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001.


Truman, Harry S. "In Truman's Own Words" (1945). Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001.


Tibbets, Paul. "On Board the Enola Gay" Interview By ALLMILITARY.com (2000). Atlanta, GA: InspirEd Educators, Inc., 2001.

Hersey, John. Hiroshima. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1946. Print.