Endangered Animals of Hawaii

North Pacific Right Whale

Photo From flickr

Description

So what are these whales? Can you tell me more about them? Well, it is classified as a mammal, and it's very specific species is Eubalaena Glacialis Japonica. Some special body parts it has are blubber( a thick layer of fat), oils, and baleen( used instead of teeth to strain food from their surroundings). It can grow to up to 50 feet long, and can weigh up to 80 tons.(Nat Geo) To communicate, it makes pulsed calls, whistling noises, clicking and honking noises.These sounds are all done under water.(Red L)

Interesting Facts


  • A group of North Pacific Right Whales is called a whale.
  • Right Whales are given their names because on a whale hunt, they were the "right" whales to kill.
  • They are identified by their big heads, which can be up to 1/3 of their body length!(Nat Geo)


Photo From flickr

Food Chain

What do they eat? Does anything eat them? The North Pacific Right Whale eats zooplankton, copepods, and euphasiids. These are all very small microorganisms, so it eats up to 1,000 to 2,500 kilograms of this a day.(Red L) It uses the 8 foot long baleen in it's mouth as a strainer (they are all packed together) to collect these. The species lives in the salt waters of the Pacific Ocean, and anywhere between the east coast of Japan and the west coast of The Americas. It lives close to the coasts. It is a carnivore, because it eats living microorganisms. It has no predators, but humans are mostly it's main threat.(Nat Geo)
Photo From flickr

Habitat

What kind of environment does the North Pacific Right Whale live in? Little is known about it's habitat. It lives on Japan's east coast, the Americas' west coasts, near Alaska, and the coasts of Hawaii. It mostly lives in waters 2,000 meters deep. Historical catches have been made at the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Sea of Okhotsk, and the North Pacific in the summer.(Red L) It likes sub- arctic and temperate weather (blubber protects it) , and likes coastal regions. It is a marine (salt water) animal that lives in the Pacific.(Nat Geo)
Photo From flickr

Adaptation

How has it adapted to it's surroundings? For protection, it stays in tight pods, and makes noises if in distress. The North Pacific Right Whale migrates north during the summer and south during the winter, since it likes sub- arctic to temperate climates.(Nat Geo) It doesn't really have special abilities, but it can swallow large amounts of food and is difficult to attack because of it's sheer size of it and it's pod. They are very loyal to each other. It also does not have any special hunting ability because it only eats microorganisms, but they do travel in packs (pods) for protection.
Photo From flickr

Endangerment & Critical Information

What is it's status right now, and what do I need to know about it? Many Japanese and Soviet sailors hunted and killed many of these whales, so this is the reason why it is endangered. In effect, during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, they came close to extinction.(Red L) Females also too not sexually mature until they are ten years old, and also, they only give birth to one calf at a time. Then the females have to wait 3 years before giving birth to another.(Nat Geo) As you can see, population rises very, very slowly.
Photo From flickr

Conservation Efforts

What is being done to help them? Laws have been passed against killing them, but there is no use now because all the extreme killing has finished. Please donate generously to preserve these helpless whales, because without your effort, the whales may go extinct. This can severely disrupt the food chain, and many other animals will start dying, because they won't have the dead whales to eat. This will go on like a chain, and no one wants their to happen. Many people have already donated. So please donate generously. You can make a difference. Picture below- mother right whale with calf, and mother whale has a scar from a vessel propeller.
Photo From flickr

Videos of the North Pacific Right Whales

Work Cited

Adaptation Big Picture

(flickr, Oregon State)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonstateuniversity/5863853395/">Oregon State University</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">cc</a>

Book

Skerry, Brian. Ocean Soul. 2011.

Conservation Efforts Big Picture

(flickr, My FWC Research)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/myfwc/8248968457/">MyFWC Research</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">cc</a>

Description Big Picture

(flickr, Massachusetts Energy)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/5622430010/">Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">cc</a>

Endangerment and Critical Information Big Picture

(flickr, Massachusetts Energy)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/5622430010/">Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">cc</a>

Food Chain Big Picture

(flickr, Massachusetts Energy)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/5621839007/">Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">cc</a>

Habitat Big Picture

(flickr,Massachusetts Energy)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/5622429078/">Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">cc</a>

Main Big Picture

(flickr, Georgia Wildlife Resources Division)photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wildliferesourcesdivision/6418929945/">Georgia Wildlife Resources Division</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/">cc</a>

National Geographic

(Nat Geo, Mammals) Right Whale "Right Whale" National Geographic March 18, 2013 <http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/right-whale/>

Redlist

(Redlist, Mammals)Eubalaena Japonica Reilly, S.B., Bannister, J.L., Best, P.B., Brown, M., Brownell Jr., R.L., Butterworth, D.S., Claphom, P.J., Cooke, J., Donovan, G.P., Urbán, J. and Zerbini, A.N. "Eubalaena Japonica" IUCN Redlist of Threatened Species. 2008, version 2012.2, March 18, 2013. <http://iucnredlist.org/details/summary/41711/0>

Video 1

North Atlantic Right Whale(Eubalaena Glacialis) Computer Video. Arkive. <http://www.arkive.org/north-atlantic-right-whale/eubalaena-glacialis/video-00.html>

Video 2

North Atlantic Right Whale( Eubalaena Glacialis) Computer Video. Arkive. <http://www.arkive.org/north-atlantic-right-whale/eubalaena-glacialis/video-01.html>