Japanese Internment Camps

The truth behind the fence

What Interment Camps Were:

The interment camps were suppose to be a "safe" place during World War Two for the Japanese population living on the coast of California.It was really a place for the government to make sure that all of the possible 'enemies' were far, far away. They were taken away from their home and shipped on a bus to various places in the dessert, where they stayed for three years. They were stripped of their identitiy and freedom, and many returned home to nothing. The government put out in the news, the radio and on posters many lies about what the camps actually were, essentially sugar coating the hardships that they went through.
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Health Care

The government put out photo's of many happy children and families recieving medical care and being checked on by doctors and nurses. They are trying to show that they keep the people in the camp healthy and clean by monthly checkups, trying to act like they care about the health of their patients.
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The truth

inside the camp is different from what they make it out to be. They really don't care about your health, infact many people died of sicknesses that spread like wildfire because they do not do provide monthy apointments. The conditions are not clean and perfecect like they make it out to be, and everyone is not always happy like the previous picture.
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Life at "home"

if you search Japonese interment camps online, many images of children playing, doing schoolwork, and hanging out. The government is trying to show that these camps were as if you have never left home, by doing every day activities.
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Boredom

Many of the children didn't do anything at all, and had to learn to make their own fun. There wasn't a school where they could learn about thier history, their only option was to take a class about u.s history. Many children chose not to participate in this class because the teachers were usually not well educated, and the learning conditons were not ideal.