Elizabeth Cady Stanton

By Mailee Ransom

Introduction

Do you know who Elizabeth Cady Stanton was? Well, now you can learn! She was an abolitionist and a suffragette. She worked for Women's Rights and helped the Union in the Civil War. "An eloquent writer, her Declaration of Sentiments was a revolutionary call for women's rights across a variety of spectrums." (Biography.com, 2015). Talk about a multi-tasker!

In her early childhood...

Elizabeth was born on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown, New York. She had a lot of stumbling blocks. For example, she had ten siblings, but only she and her four sisters lived long enough to be adults. "The daughter of a lawyer who made no secret of his preference for another son, she early showed her desire to excel in intellectual and other "male" spheres. She graduated from the Emma Willard's Troy Female Seminary in 1832 and then was drawn to the abolitionist, temperance, and women's rights movements through visits to the home of her cousin, the reformer Gerrit Smith." (Biography.com 2015)

Some Pictures of Her

What is a suffragette? What is an abolitionist?

A suffragette is a women who "fights" for women's rights. They want women to be able to vote. They want equal rights for all people, especially women.

An abolitionist is a person who tries to stop slavery. They believe in equal rights for everyone.

In a way, they are all very similar!

She was a suffragette and an abolitionist.

Elizabeth got married to Henry Stanton in 1840. They ended up having seven kids, not as many as her parents but still quite a few. He is in the picture to the right. They settled in Seneca Falls. "While attending anti-slavery conventions, Elizabeth also met women who felt as strongly about women's rights as she did, women such as Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, and Susan B. Anthony." (Ducksters.com, 2015). In 1848, she and Lucretia Mott, as well as several other ladies, held the Seneca Falls Convention that was for Women's Rights. There, they wrote the Declaration of Sentiments that proposed the right for women to vote. Elizabeth wrote most of it, because she was a really good writer. She had a way with words.

Did you know she knew Susan B Anthony? She did! They met in the early 1850's. They worked together to give women their rights. During the Civil War, they worked together to write an abolitionist newspaper.

After the War...

After the Civil War, Elizabeth and Susan started another newspaper about suffragettes called the Revolution. Then they formed the National Women's Suffrage Association, or the NWSA. They did that stuff in 1869. Elizabeth was the president. Then they joined another group to create the National American Women's Suffrage Association, or the NAWSA. She was also the president of this. They did a lot of fighting for Women's Rights. They hoped that in the 15th Amendmentwould allow women to vote. Nevertheless, "When the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified in 1870, it did not include women." (Ducksters.com, 2015).

In 1881 to 1886, Elizabeth and Susan wrote 3 volumes of something called The History of Women Suffrage. Later, she and her daughter Harriot wrote The Women's Bible published in two volumes, first in 1895 then 1898.

Conclusion

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a very important person in our history. She wrote many books, newspapers, and the Declaration of Sentiments. She worked hard so we could have the freedom and equality that we have today. She was so significant to affect our country that way. She was a great person.

Bibliography

Works Cited

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