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Outdoor activities

In Big thicket there is hiking and canoeing and kayaking

Hiking there is about 40 miles of hiking trails through Big Thicket National Preserve, hikers are allowed to watch many different ecosystems. Trails range from a 0.3-mile boardwalk loop to 15 miles. Canoeing and kayaking

Village Creek and the Neches River provide many ways to paddle for canoeists and kayakers, about few hours to several days. The preserve includes two Texas State Paddling Trails: the 21-mile Village Creek Paddling Trail and the 5-mile Cooks Lake Paddling Trail. their is equipment and shuttle services.

info from http://www.nps.gov/bith/planyourvisit/things2do.htm

Flora and fauna

The pinywoods of Texas covered between 2 million and 3 million acres in what is now mapped as the Pineywoods and Coastal Marsh ecoregions of the state. People have called the Big Thicket an "American ark" and "the biological crossroads of North America", as it has one of the most biologically diverse assemblages of species in the world. It is a transition zone where southeastern swamps, eastern deciduous forests, central plains, pine savannas, and dry sandhills meet. This diverse habitat allows an impressive array of species to coexist, including about 1,320 species of trees, shrubs, vines, andgrasses (vascular plants), 60 mammal species, 86 reptile & amphibian species, 34 species of freshwater mussels, nearly 1,800 invertebrate species just in the Lepidoptera Family (butterflies,moths, skippers), 97 fish species, and at least 300 bird species. http://www.nps.gov/bith/learn/nature/index.htm
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Piney woods history

.Hundreds of years ago, different countries in Europe wanted to claim this part of Texas as their own. France and Spain both sent explorers to see what was here. Spanish explorers first traveled through East Texas and met the Caddo people over 450 years ago. The French came a little while later, and lived in the area for a time. The French were enemies of the Spanish. When the Spanish found out that French people were living in East Texas, they built missions and forts there to keep them out. None of them lasted very long for many reasons. The Native Americans who lived there did not want to change their religion or their way of life. The missions were so far away from big cities that they couldn’t get supplies very easily. They were also not very well protected because there were not enough soldiers there to guard them.


One of the oldest cities in Texas, Nacogdoches, is located right here in the Pineywoods. Like the rest of the Pineywoods region of East Texas, Nacogdoches has been home to Native Americans, Spaniards, the French, African-Americans, and Texans. It was named after a group of Caddo Indians who lived in the area. You can still see some of the mounds they built. The Spanish built a mission in Nacogdoches. Though the mission is long gone, the city is still here today. Many historians say that the Texas Revolution started with the Battle of Nacogdoches. The first newspaper in Texas was published in Nacogdoches. Nacogdoches has been an important city for many reasons!

tp://www.nps.gov/bith/learn/historyculture/index.htm

parks

Life of all types abounds in the Big Thicket. This national preserve protects the incredible diversity of life found where multiple habitats converge in southeast Texas. Hiking trails and waterways meander through nine different ecosystems, from longleaf pine forests to cypress-lined bayous. It is a place of discovery, a place to wander and explore, a place to marvel at the richness of nature.

Climate

Climate: average yearly rainfall of 36 to 50 inches is fairly uniformly distributed throughout the year, and humidity and temperatures are typically high

Historical place

Pineywoods residents call home the “Cradle of Texas.” It’s here that the story of Texas begins. In Nacogdoches and Angelina counties, you’ll discover historic landmarks commemorating East Texas history, from the beginning right up to the present. A rebuilt fort, historic houses, municipal parks, and markers pinpointing historic locales pave the road back in time for history-buff travelers. Check out these popular sites: