SAFETY TIP TUESDAY- NCESD

Provided by the North Central ESD Workers Compensation Trust

THE POWER OF SAFETY

Do you know how to tell if the pair of glasses you found in the back of the junk drawer are actually strong enough to protect your eyes from a small rock thrown by the lawn mower?


The American National Safety Institute (ANSI) eye protection standard Z87.1-2010 requires that manufacturers mark protective eyewear with information directly related to the device’s ability to provide protection from specific hazards including impact, splash, dust and optical radiation.

WHAT DO THE MARKINGS MEAN?

If the protective eye wear is Z87.1 compliant, it will be marked Z87.


A “+” behind the Z87 mark or the manufacturer’s name, i.e., “Z87+” or “3M+”, indicates the devices are impact rated. Impact rated prescription frames should be marked Z87-2+ on the front and on one temple.


The letter “D” is used to mark devices rated to provide chemical splash and dust protection.

D3 = droplet (splash) protection

D4 = dust protection

D5 = fine dust protection.


The letter "H" is used to mark products designed for smaller head sizes.


Devices offering protection from optical radiation hazards are marked with a letter corresponding to the type of filter and sometimes a shade/scale number corresponding to the level of protection provided.

W = Welding filters; shade scale range 1.3 to 14

U = Ultra-violet filters; scale range 2 – 6

R – Infra-red (heat) filters; scale range 1.3 - 10

L = Visible light (glare); scale range 1.3 – 10 (low numbers = more light transmittance)

V = Variable tint

S = Special purpose.

BUT WHAT DOES THE Z87+ IMPACT RATING REALLY MEAN?

To earn the impact rating, protective devices must pass high mass and high velocity tests without breaking or cracking and meet defined continuous lateral coverage requirements.


To pass the “high mass” test, the frame and lenses must be able to withstand a 500 gram pointed weight dropped from a height of about 50 inches. Glasses must be able to withstand a ¼” steel ball travelling at from 3 different heights and 7 different angles to pass the "high velocity" test. Goggles are tested with a velocity of 170 mph.

DON’T BE FOOLED BY CHEAP IMMITATIONS

If you need impact protection and can’t find the “Z87+” marking, look for another pair of safely glasses or goggles. Don’t risk your eyes with a pair of cheap imitations!

North Central ESD Workers' Compensation Trust

Providing Risk Management Services to Reduce On-The-Job Injuries