Why the Violence in Football?

Football Violence

Sports violence is a topic that has been noticed for some time now. New rules have been made in the professional football league, but it still hasn't stopped the violence in football all together.

If children see violence being tolerated at the professional level they believe it should be tolerated at the intermediate level or beginning level. Children see their favorite sports players using violence to get them what they want in the game so the children will use the same violence in their games to get what they want out of the game. "Athletes in the youth leagues emulate their heroes on the collegiate and professional levels. They watch their sports heroes receive awards, applause, money, and adulation for behavior that borders on open aggression, and they want to become like them" (Cox, 2012.p.337).

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What happens when violence is used in football...

When violence is used in the game of football it causes more injuries, more injuries to the players that are detrimental to the game.

(The image is showing a New York Jet being helped off the field after being injured by the other team.)

(NYTimes.com)

What happens when their is violence on the field...does it lead to violence off the field?

More often than not when a player is violent on the field they become violent off the field. The player seems to feel they get what they want when they use violence on the field so why not use it off the field as well? There are more professional football players being arrested for domestic abuse than anyone else. Football players are paid for their violent behavior on the field and tend to take that behavior to their personal lives. (Time, 2014).

Stopping the violence on the field

Violence is being lessened on the field by creating more penalties. Violence is something that is going to take some time to be totally eliminated from the game. Professional football players have been used to the violence for so long it has become a way of life. It has been the only way that the players know how to play.

References

Cox, Richard H. (2012). Sport Psychology: Concepts and Applications. 7th edition. New York, NY: McGraw Hill Education.


Kluger, Jeffrey. (Spetember 18, 2014). Why On-Field Violence Continues Off-Field. Time. Retrieved from http://time.com/3398946/nfl-violence-psychology/


Rhoden, William C. (September 14, 2015). A Quick Reminder of Football's Violence. NY Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/14/sports/football/a-quick-reminder-of-footballs-violence.html