Reproductive Cloning

Does Reproductive Cloning Benefit Humans?

Background Info.

  • Cloning has not been tested yet on a nonhuman primate model
  • 7% of Americans said that they would clone themselves if they were given a chance
  • There are three different types of cloning
  1. Reproductive cloning
  2. Therapeutic cloning
  3. Embryonic cloning
  • In June 1997 President Bill Clinton banned all government funding for human cloning research
  • 90% of babbies that came from a cloned animal, died

Pros

  • could reverse aging process
  • can clone endangered species to save them
  • may be able to prevent cancer by turning off genes the cancer is in
  • new technology could bring much wealth to US
  • in the future it will have medical benefits

Cons

  • there are health & welfare risks to humans who are being cloned
  • children of clones might be thought of as product not child
  • clones might end up being used for organs
  • "banning the technology of cloning would only give our enemies the advantage to use it against us so it could harm humans in the US if we don't start cloning and other countries do"
  • cloning just passes down diseases to another being or clone
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Conclusion

I believe reproductive cloning would benefit humans.This is because it helps in many medical ways. It also has risks but the outcome is worth the risk. It might be able to prevent cancer, reverse the aging process, and the money t we will get from will go toward more research that could bring more medical benefits. If the United States is the first to do it we could be on the top of the charts. If our country is on top it will somehow help the citizens who live here. It could also help animals. People who work in the animal rescue system could use reproductive cloning. When animals start to go extinct they could clone the animal to help. This helps the workers because they get more money to find research for more ways to help. this is why reproductive cloning benefits humans.
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Biography

Fitzgerald, Kevin T. "Cloning Research Would Not Benefit Humans." Biomedical Ethics. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1998. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2015.


Genetics, Nature. "Cloning Research Could Be Beneficial to Humans." Biomedical Ethics. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1998. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.


"Human Cloning Foundation." Gale Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2014. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2015.


Klotzko, Arlene Judith. "Cloning Humans Is Not Yet Safe." Cloning. Ed. Sylvia Engdahl. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2006. Contemporary Issues Companion. Rpt. from "Is It Time to Allow Cloning: No, but Purely Because It Is Not Safe." Edge (June 2004): 18-19. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.


Soules, Michael R. "Human Reproductive Cloning Is Not Ethical." Medical Ethics. Ed. Laura K. Egendorf. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2005. Current Controversies. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.


Stock, Gregory, and Francis Fukuyama. "Reproductive Cloning Should Not Be Banned." Cloning. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2006. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "The Clone Wars: A Reason Online Debate." Reason 34 (June 2002). Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2015


Zavos, Panayiotis. "Reproductive Cloning Is Moral." The Ethics of Human Cloning. Ed. John Woodward. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2005. At Issue. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.