Imprinting

Arianne Goode

By following and adopting another's actions, animals can learn the basic ways to survive in the wild. This process is known as "imprinting". By imprinting, animals in their early stages can copy behaviors of others and acquire the keys of life.
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Running With the Family

Imprinting on a parent or family member is ideal for a tiny animal. Having a close relative guide them throughout infancy would show animals how to behave like one of their own species. Knowing how to act without looking out of place is the finest situation for a little creature.


Photo: http://babyanimalz.com/2012/12/baby-lemur-and-his-mother/

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Blood Doesn't Always Know Best

Naturally, we think that young animals always imprint on their family and never anyone else, copying their actions and doing exactly as they do: this isn't always the case, though. In fact, some animals will imprint on members of other species. Once an animal imprints, they will neither forget nor replace whom they have imprinted on.


Photo: http://barkpost.com/18-dogs-caring-for-other-baby-animals/

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A Truly Unique Connection

Think about how peculiar it is for an animal to imprint on a member of another species. What's even more unusual, though, is when an animal imprints on a nonliving object: a stuffed animal, a vacuum cleaner, or anything else. Whatever the object, an animal that imprints on something inanimate will copy its actions, behaving just like it.


Photo: http://pansypanda.com/stuffed-animal-version/