PRESENT SHOCK

When Everything Happens NOW

Douglas Rushkoff

Douglas Rushkoff is the author of Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now as well as a dozen other bestselling books on media, technology, and culture, including Program or Be Programmed, Media Virus, Life Incand the novel Ecstasy Club. He is Professor of Media Theory and Digital Economics at CUNY/Queens. He wrote the graphic novels Testament and A.D.D., and made the television documentaries Generation Like, Merchants of Cool, The Persuaders, and Digital Nation. He lives in New York, and lectures about media, society, and economics around the world.
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Amber Hirsch

NPR Rushkoff by Amber Hirsch

“We may not know where we’re going anymore, but we’re going to get there a whole lot faster. Yes, we may be in the midst of some great existential crisis, but we’re simply too busy to notice.”

“Through the lens of narrative, America isn’t just a place where we live but it is a journey of a people through time. Apple isn’t a smart phone manufacture, but two guys in a garage who had a dream about how creative people may someday gain control over technology. Democracy is not a methodology for governing, but the force that will liberate humanity. Pollution is not an ongoing responsibility of industry, but the impending catastrophic climax of human civilization.”

Present Shock
Martin Luther King Jr. wouldn’t be able to rally people to realize his great dream today. He would be as desperate for hourly retweets as the rest of us, gathering “likes” from followers on Facebook as a substitute for marching with them.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/01/how-technology-killed-the-future-102236.html#ixzz3Tr0jlLu4
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“This freedom to choose and make choices is the underlying promise of the digital era, or of any new technology. Electric lighting gives us the freedom to choose when to sleep, asphalt gives us the choice where to drive our cars; Prozac gives us the freedom to choose an otherwise depressing lifestyle. But making choices is also inherently polarizing and dualist. It means we prefer one thing over another and want to change things to suit our sense of how things ought to be.”

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"The real issue is not that computers can form relationships, but that people can't."

The 19th Annual New Jersey Communication Association Conference

Saturday, April 11th, 8am

2641 John F Kennedy Boulevard West

Jersey City, NJ

Keynote Speaker: Douglas Rushkoff