Bog Turtle

Renee Jenkins

The Bog Turtle's Habitat.

Wetlands are the connection between land and water, and there are many species of animals that can live there. Wetlands can hold excess flood water and many other things. There are many purposes to wetlands. These lands need protection due to the recent popping up of housing developments, killing the animals that live there and the land. There are many ways that people can protect wetlands. Developers who buy the land should be aware of what is legal to do there and not legal to do there. They should follow all guidelines set by the government so that they don't get in trouble or hurt the animals in the environment. Everyday people like us can help to protect wetlands by simply spending more time outdoors and learning more about wetlands. They can join organizations to help clean up and protect wetlands. People can also speak out and protest protection of these wetlands. One of the animals that are native to wetlands are the bog turtle. They are a small breed of turtle that full grown are only three and a half to four inches long. They take 5-8 years to breed and lay eggs. They are becoming endangered because people will find them and keep them. They don't return them back to the wetland that they found them in. They are easily identified not just by the size of them, but also because of the yellow or orange stripe that is on their neck. They are usually either black, dark olive green, or coffee brown. Because of the taking over of wetlands, the bog turtles are becoming endangered of being extinct. If you take the time to get to your wetlands better, you will be able to help protect these little turtles from extinction.

Works Cited.

<http://www.google.com/
search?hl=en&q=Bog%20turtles&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44990110,d.dmQ&
amp;biw=1600&bih=805&noj=1&safe=strict&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=
isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=XFVlUZP5OLCB0QHQvID4Cg#imgrc=k6gcQB
_IRtHX8M%3A%3BbXrFIlz4lbpgGM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Ffarm4.static.flickr.com%252F309
3%252F5860909825_583acf50cc.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.flickriver.com%252Fphoto
s%252Ftags%252Fblandings%252Finteresting%252F%3B500%3B333>

Works Cited.

The Department of Natural Resources. Maryland State, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.
<http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/herps/Testudines/
BogTurtle.asp>.

Works Cited.

"Bog Turtle: A Species in Decline." Sirs. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Sirs. Web. 10
Apr. 2013. <http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/
hst-article-display?id=SPL2699-0-848&artno=0000098198&type=ART&shfilter=U&key=Bog
%20Turtle&title=Bog%20Turtle%2D%2DA%20Species%20in%20Decline&res=Y&ren=N&gov=N&ln
k=N&ic=N>.

Works Cited.

US EPA. United States Environmental Protection Agency, n.d. Web. 11 Apr. 2013.
<http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/guidance/wetlands/eo11990.cfm>.

Works Cited.

American Wetlands. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Apr. 2013.
<http://www.americaswetlandresources.com/youcanhelp/index.html>.