Terracotta Soldier

By: Scott Nguyen

Introduction

Welcome to the world of Terracotta Soldiers!

Who was it?

Qin Shi Huangdi did it and who is Qin. He is the first emperor of China.

What tools did they use to make it?

They use their hands to make the Terracotta Soldiers. The Terracotta Army was made of yellow clay, which is mainly composed of silicon oxide, aluminium oxide, ferric oxide, has the same structure and texture with Qin''s eave tile. But the source of clay are not the same for making warriors and horses.

Why Were the Terracotta Warriors Made?

The army of terracotta statues was made to be buried with First Emperor Qin Shihuang:

  1. as a show of his glory,
  2. to remember the army that triumphed over the other Waring States to unite China, and
  3. because it was believed that objects like statues can be animated in the afterlife, and because Qin Shihuang required an after-death army.

When did they make it?

Back in 2200 years ago in the Qin's Dynasty.

How was it made?

The Terracotta Army was made of yellow clay, which is mainly composed of silicon oxide, aluminium oxide, ferric oxide, has the same structure and texture with Qin''s eave tile. But the source of clay are not the same for making warriors and horses.

Where the Museum for the Terracotta Soldier.

It is in Xian, China. If you are in Beijing and ride a train it takes 8 hours to get there and the bullet train is about 4 hours.

Did you know

- The chamber containing the Terra Cotta Army was discovered in 1974 by a group of farmers attempting to dig a well near the ancient capital city of Chang'an in what is today the Shaanxi Province, near the modern city of Xi'an.
- The "army" is made up of more than 8,000 figures including soldiers, horses, chariots, bowmen and archers. The figures are life-sized, and each has a unique face and details.
- The terra cotta soldiers were found arranged in military formation in large pits with rammed earth walls dividing the rows. Four main pits have been excavated: three with figures in them and one empty, suggesting that the full tomb army was not completed before the emperor's death.
- The figures were made using molds for different pieces, which were then assembled. Although the statues were originally brightly painted, the paint has since mostly flaked away.
- The tomb of the Terra Cotta Army was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987. It attracts an estimated 2 million visitors each year.