Anorexia

Amanda Zysko

Does Media/Society Influence Anorexia?

Yes, media/society does influence anorexia because of mental disorders, modeling industries and unnecessary comparison.
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Mental Disorder

  • Media’s promotion of a thin body cause women to develop distorted body images which can lead to anorexia.
  • Society influences people that in order to be "pretty" you have to be "skinny" and that messes with peoples minds and causing them to believe that the statement is true.
  • Media constantly uses skinny women/men in advertisements and causes insecure women/men to want to look like that.


"A study showed that women experience an average of 13 negative thoughts about their body each day, while 97% of women admit to having at least one “I hate my body” moment each day." "Media Influence." Eating Disorders and. Radar Programs, 2014. Web. 01 Feb. 2014.


"From early-on children are taught by society that their looks matter." "Eating Disorders and the Media | Media Influence on Eating Disorders | Anorexia | Bulimia | Eating Disorders | Compulsive Overeating." Eating Disorders and the Media | Media Influence on Eating Disorders | Anorexia | Bulimia | Eating Disorders | Compulsive Overeating | The Something Fishy Website on Eating Disorders. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Jan. 2014.

Modeling Industry

  • Girls that want to become models have to be a certain weight, which may cause them to starve themselves if overweight or even normal.
  • Fashion models’ weight averaged only 8% less than the average women 20 years ago. Today the average fashion model weighs 23% less than the average woman.

"The majority of runway model meet the Body Mass Index (BMI) criteria to be considered anorexic.

Vogue magazine stated that they chose Gisele Bunchen as their “model of the year” due, in part, to the fact that she deviates from the typical “rail thin” image. In fact, Gisele weighs only 115 lbs. and is 5’11 – 25% below her ideal weight.

At 5’7 and 95 lbs. Kate Moss is 30% below her ideal weight"


"Media Influence." Eating Disorders and. Radar Programs, 2014. Web. 01 Feb. 2014.

Unnecessary Comparison

Women tend to compare themselves to other women who may be naturally skinny and think “I want to be like her”


"When we compare ourselves with others in any fashion, there are two things that can happen. Sometimes we may see ourselves as superior and, therefore, look down on others. More commonly, though, it seems that the result of comparing ourselves with others is quite the opposite. It makes us feel inferior or inadequate. We cut ourselves down and become discouraged. We don’t feel we’re as smart, good looking or talented as others. In the end, we want to be like someone else instead of being content with and celebrating who we are and who we can become. "


-"Freedom from Eating Disorders - Comparison and Eating Disorders." Freedom from Eating Disorders - Comparison and Eating Disorders. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014.

Credits

Woman Measuring Her Waist. Photography.Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 7 Feb 2014.

Fashion - London Fashion Exhibition - 1979.Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest.Web. 7 Feb 2014.


COMPARING SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY Lead Weighs More Than Aluminum, Blocks Of Lead And Aluminum Of The Same Size Are Placed On A Balance.Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest.Web. 7 Feb 2014.


"Freedom from Eating Disorders - Comparison and Eating Disorders." Freedom from Eating Disorders - Comparison and Eating Disorders. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014.


"Eating Disorders and the Media | Media Influence on Eating Disorders | Anorexia | Bulimia | Eating Disorders | Compulsive Overeating." Eating Disorders and the Media | Media Influence on Eating Disorders | Anorexia | Bulimia | Eating Disorders | Compulsive Overeating | The Something Fishy Website on Eating Disorders. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Jan. 2014.


"Media Influence." Eating Disorders and. Radar Programs, 2014. Web. 01 Feb. 2014.