Sequoyah

The making of Syllabery

Thesis

Sequoyah affected the cherokee in a positive manner.

The making of the written cherokee language

Sequoyah talked with his friends about the white mans written language. That gave Sequoyah the idea to make the cherokee language in symbols. He began his work and for years after he married and had children his work was finished. His written language was tested on his children and fellow tribe members. He made the language by listening to the syllables that the cherokee use when speaking. He then made a symbol for each of the syllables used.

Sequoyah's Parents

Sequoyah's mom was the niece of a chief cherokee. His fathers name isn't clear but it is widely accepted that his name was Nathaniel Gist. Nathaniel left after getting in trouble due to his selling of alcohol to indians. He had commited many other crimes and left from those as well. His mother raised him and created a shop where Sequoyah worked until she died and he took over.

His impact on the Cherokee Nation

He improved the view that others had on cherokee but, being half anglo may have increased the thought that native Americans couldn't the same way biologically. The majority of Cherokee indians became literate 5 years after the release of his syllabary to the public. His creation changed how the Natives thought of witch craft and made them distinguish between the writing's of white men and magic.

Sequoyah's club

Sequoyah was born with a condition known as club foot. He had one of his feet that was angled inwards appearing to look like a club. He did not like sports but grew kind of metal work and being a merchant. No medical treatment was around to reverse this birth defect at the time. He accomplished many things without full use of his foot and the ability to walk for a long period of time.

Sequoyah's family

In his late 20's Sequoyah married Elisabeth White and had a daughter Wu-Teh. Sequoyah tested his writings with Wu-Teh and his brother-in-law Michael White.
Big image
Big image

Quirks

Though he had a disability he smoked a pipe and walked on his club foot frequently. He died in 1790 most likely due to his smoking.

Silver Smith abilities

He became a skilled silversmith and fulfilled a niche that Native Americans had. He was not able to hunt so he made a living making products mostly of silver and other ores. Sequoyah frequently made silver lamps and sold them at his merchant shop that he ran after his mother's death. His creations were treasured for the unique style he held.

The mysterious Sequoyah

Conclusion

Sequoyah made a written language that is still used to this day. Though he did not impact the cherokee in a major way he may have increased racism towards indians he still made a great product that helped the cherokee in a time of grief. Overall he made a positive affect on the cherokee tribe.
THE WORLD'S MOST RELAXING VIDEO
Sequoyah's Cherokee Syllabary

Sources

Clubfoot." - Mayo Clinic. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

Dilworth, George R. The Language of Cherokee. 1st ed. Vol. 1. Pennsylvania: Aberjona, 2006. Print. Native Americans Life.

Book

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah - Inventor of the Cherokee Syllabary." Sequoyah - Inventor of the Cherokee Syllabary. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary." Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary." Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah." Sequoyah. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit

More

"Sequoyah's Cabin." Sequoyah's Cabin. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.

Website

Comments Copy & paste Parenthetical Edit