Mrs. Jacques Newsletter

Study Skills Discovery and Learning Style Preferences

Visual Learner

Did your Learning Style assessment tell you that you are a visual learner?


If you are visual, you need to SEE things in order to remember them and store them in your brain. How can you use this knowledge to change your study environment at home? Keep reading to get some ideas:



  • You can use a highlighter when reviewing your notes. If your notes are on paper, use a pen highlighter, if your notes are on your electronic device use the background highlighter option to color the important information.
  • You can read through your notes and create a drawing to represent the information.
  • You can watch a video on the topic you are learning about.
  • During class make sure you are paying attention and "watching" the teacher or whoever is presenting.

Auditory Learner

Did your Learning Style assessment tell you that you are an auditory learner?


If you are auditory, you need to HEAR and SPEAK things in order to remember them and store them in your brain. How can you use this knowledge to change your study environment at home? Keep reading to get some ideas:


  • You can read your notes, articles, assignments out loud to yourself.
  • You can listen to a podcast or video on the topic you are learning about.
  • You can verbally quiz a study partner and then have that person do the same for you.
  • You can have a discussion about the topic in a study group.
  • You need to pay attention and "listen" to your teacher (or presenter) speak.

Kinesthetic, Tactile and Mobile Learner

Did your Learning Style assessment tell you that you are a kinesthetic, tactile and/or a mobile learner?


If you are a kinesthetic, tactile and/or mobile learner, you need to DO things in order to remember them and store them in your brain. How can you use this knowledge to change your study environment at home? Keep reading to get some ideas:



  • You can walk around when reviewing your notes.
  • You can toss a ball with a study partner, and quiz each other.
  • You can make a flash card game, like concentration, to learn facts, dates and terms.
  • You can write quizzes for an adult that is helping you (or a peer study partner) and have someone take the quiz. You can then correct it and go over the answers with the person that took your quiz.
  • You can use a timer to set up movement breaks for yourself