September 29, 1764: The Sugar Act

A PROCLAMATION FROM THE KING!

Why this tax has been put in place.

This tax has been put in place in order to improve revenue for the kingdom. The recent war depleted Britain's fortune, so we; the king's most trusted advisers, have resolved to grant unto you majesty the several rates mentioned after. Please respect and obey these acts placed by your King in his land. Here shall be raised, levied, and collected unto His majesty the king, his royal highness George Ⅲ.

About the Stamp Act

For and upon all white or clayed sugars of the produce or manufacture of any colony or plantation in America, not under the dominion of his Majesty, his heirs and successors; for and upon indigo, and coffee of foreign producers; for and upon wines (except French wine;) for and upon all wrought silks, bengals, and stuffs, mixed with silk or herbs of the manufacture of Persia, China, or East India, and all calico dyed there; and for and upon all foreign linen cloth called Cambrick and French Lawns, which shall be imported or brought into any colony in America, is under his Majesty's control.

The tax amount for each item.

  • For every hundred weight avoirdupois of such foreign white or clayed sugars, one pound two shillings, over and above all other duties imposed by any former act of parliament.

  • For every pound weight avoirdupois of such foreign indigo, six pence.

  • For every hundred weight avoirdupois of such foreign coffee, which shall be imported from any place, except Great Britain, two pounds, nineteen shillings, and nine pence.

  • For every ton of wine of the growth of the Madeiras, or of any other island or place from whence such wine may be lawfully imported, and which shall be so imported from such islands or place, the sum of seven pounds

  • For every ton of Portugal, Spanish, or any other wine (except French wine) imported from Great Britain, the sum of ten shillings.

  • For every pound weight avoirdupois of wrought silks, bengals, and stuffs, mixed silk or herbs, of the manufacture of Persia, China, or East India, imported from Great Britain, two shillings.

  • For every piece of callico painted, dyed, printed, or stained, in Persia, China, or East India, imported from Great Britain, two shillings and six pence.

  • For every piece of foreign linen cloth, called Cambrick, imported from Great Britain, three shillings.

  • For every piece of French lawn imported from Great Britain, three shillings

About us

We are parliament, the King's most trusted advisers. What ever we say is from the king so don't argue with us!