Common Core Articles

By Tristan Elliott and Andrew Goins

How do the authors utilize statistics to demonstrate teacher and general approval of Common Core?

In article one, there is data from polls taken by teaches, but in article two, the author uses quotes and what people have said about the Common Core.

What is unique about author one’s approach vs. author two’s approach?

In article one, the author's approach to the topic is unique because she is using data while the author in article two is unique because she is using quotes and things that people have said about the Common Core.

What data does the first author include to support her claim? What data does the second author include to support her claim?

The data that the author of Article one uses is straight facts. They use percentages, surveys, and more. The data that the author of article two uses more opinions than facts. They use the opinions from the people and their own opinion.

How do the tones differ?

In article one, it's more of trying to get rid of or to stop Common Core. The article does not show both sides of the argument it only shows the negative side of the argument. In article two, it shows both sides of the argument therefore the tone is neutral. The second argument is more biased than article two. This article shows both the positive and negative sides of the argument.

What do the two texts have in common?

Both of the texts are talking about Common Core. Both texts show some of the negative side of the argument. Both articles also have the opinions of teachers and students.

What is the authors purpose in writing the article?

The purpose of writing article one is to show the negative effects of Common Core State Standards. The purpose of writing article two is to show the positive effects of Common Core State Standards. Article two also shows more of the opinion of the public than article two that mostly shows results from polls taken.