The Nuremberg Laws

By: Mason Stephens 2nd Period

Hitler Comes Into Power

In 1933, German president Paul Von Hindenburg made Hitler the new chancellor. As soon as Hitler became the chancellor, he created the Enabling law, that gave Hitler the power of making laws without the Reichstag having to vote on them. Two weeks later, he formed modern-day Germany by taking away power from the smaller states that became united in 1871, and other individual groups that were a possible threat to him. During the night of June 30, 1934, Hitler sent members of the Himmler's SS, to kill German military leader, Ernst Rohm, which later became known as the "Night Of The Long Knives". Even though Hitler saw Rohm as a friend, he was selfish enough to have him killed because Hitler saw him as a possible threat to his ruling. A month later, President Hindenburg died, and Hitler took full power of the country of Germany and its military. Now that he has full power, Hitler creates the Nuremberg Laws which led to the Holocaust.


Source:

Whiting, Jim. The Story Of The Holocaust. Hockessin, DE: Mitchell Lane, 2006. Print.

Reich Citizenship Law

The first Nuremberg law Hitler put into power, was the Reich Citizenship Law. This law divided normal German people from Jews. From here on out Judaism, is considered a race more than it is a religion. People with 3 or more Jewish grandparents, were considered a Jew, even if they were Christians.

Law For The Protection Of German Blood and German Honor

The second law Hitler passed, was the Law For The Protection Of German Blood and German Honor. This law banned marriage between Jews and Non-Jews. Also no female German under the age of 45, could work for a Jew. This is because, if a male Jew were to commit sexual assault to a female citizen, she would be considered a Jew too. Soon signs were placed around businesses, restaurants, and stores saying, " Jews Prohibited".

Importance of The Nuremberg Laws

As a result of the Nuremberg Laws, many Jews had to leave their homes in Germany, because of their Jewish ancestry. Also, The Nuremberg Laws established the beginning of the Holocaust, that forever changed the way the world thinks about Germany.

Facts

1. Kurt Landauer, was the Jewish President of Bayern Munich in 1913, and survived concentration camps.

2. Since Hitler's mom was Jewish, Hitler would of been considered Jewish too.

3. Adam Sandler is Jewish, so he too would of been sent to a concentration camp.

4. German citizens were required to have a license to get married, which was gotten from a medical exam to see if they were disease free or not. Many ill people didn't have anyone to care for them.

5. Jews were not allowed to vote.

Big image

ushmm.org

This source is reliable, because it is a museum database. I can personally go to this museum to gather more information.

The History Place

This is a reliable source, because it cites where it got its information from.

Works Cited

Bodden, Valerie. The Holocaust. Mankato, MN: Creative Education, 2008. Print.

A Brief History of Nazi Germany. Digital image. Weebly.com. Web. <http://9benglish2013.weebly.com/>.

Digital image. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/triumph/tr-nurem-laws.htm>.

"Ernst Rohm | German Army Officer." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, Web. 02 Feb. 2016. <http://www.britannica.com/biography/Ernst-Rohm>.

"The History Place - World War II in Europe Timeline: September 15, 1935 - The Nuremberg Race Laws." The History Place - World War II in Europe Timeline: September 15, 1935 - The Nuremberg Race Laws. Web. 01 Feb. 2016. <http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/nurem-laws.htm>.

Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles Times, Web. 04 Feb. 2016. <http://www.latimes.com/sports/soccer/la-sp-soccer-baxter-20141005-story.html>

A motorcyclist reads a sign stating "Jews are not welcomed here." Germany, ca. 1935. Digital image. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?MediaId=5233>.

The Nuremberg Laws Explanation Chart. Digital image. WW2HQ. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://worldwar2headquarters.com/HTML/posters/german/nuremberg-laws.html>.

"The Nuremberg Race Laws — Oral History." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, Web. 02 Feb. 2016. <http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/media_oi.php?ModuleId=10007695&MediaId=2711>.

USHMM. "Nuremberg Laws." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 01 Feb. 2016. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007902>.

Whiting, Jim. The Story of the Holocaust. Hockessin, DE: Mitchell Lane, 2006. Print.