Brown vs. Board of education

Kamryn T. Angel S. Daniel L.

Intruduction

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, case in which on May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously (9–0) that racial segregation in public schools violated the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibits the states from denying equal protection of the laws to any person within their jurisdictions. The decision declared that separate educational facilities for white and African American students were inherently unequal.Considered one of the most important rulings in the court’s history, Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka helped to inspire the American civil rights movement of the late 1950s and 1960s.

In a subsequent opinion on the question of relief, commonly referred to as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (II), argued April 11–14, 1955, and decided on May 31 of that year, Warren ordered the district courts and local school authorities to take appropriate steps to integrate public schools in their jurisdictions “with all deliberate speed.” Public schools in Southern states, however, remained almost completely segregated until the late 1960s.