Preservation of the Komodo Dragon

Varanus komodoensis

Conservation vs. Preservation

Conservation

Conservation of the environment deals with conserving wildlife and natural resources. The term most commonly means conserving for human use.


Preservation

Preservation of the environment means preserving the way the environment was before humans interfered. To preserve an environment is to keep all human interferance out of it.


Preserving Komdo Dragons

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Decline

The decline of the Komodo Dragon can be traced to habitat destruction, poaching of their prey, and hunting. The island of Komodo and several surrounding islands are protected within Komodo National Park, but not all of the Komodo Dragons habitats are protected. Komodo Dragons were once found on the island of Padar, but are now extinct on that island due to hunting of the dragons and their prey by natives on the island.
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Status

Komodo Dragons are currently considered "VULNERABLE" according to the IUCN redlist.


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Preservation

Komodo Dragons have been protected by law since 1933, and are protected within the boundaries of Komodo National Park. International trade is illegal according to appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).
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Population

The current population of the Komodo Dragon is estimated to be at 4000-5000.

There are 100 on Gili Motang, 100 on Gili Dasami, 1,300 on Rinca, 1,700 on Komodo, and 2,000 on Flores.


Komodo National Park

Komodo National Park

The Indonesian Government combined several nature reserves to form the park in 1980. It was formed to help protect the Komodo Dragon from being poached, and to preserve the Komodo Dragon's Ecosystem, both marine and terrestrial.


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Location

Komodo National National park is located in Indonesia, West of the Island Flores and East of the Island of Sumbawa.

Summary

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