Jon Watson

Freshwater Food Web

Freshwater Food Web


Freshwater is home to many life forms. Some Secondary consumers are the rainbow trout, Dragonflies, and the American Bullfrog. Some primary consumers are mice, rats, deer, fish. Some Tertiary consumers are the Hawk and Bull Frog.

How Humans Are Effecting The Environment

The ecosystem of a freshwater lake or river can be extremely fragile. Fresh water biomes make up only one percent of the Earth’s surface, but they provide a home for a disproportionate number of the world’s species. Humans also depend on freshwater ecosystems for survival, but their impact on these waterways can be devastating.


Freshwater ecosystems near towns and cities face threats from runoff and pollution. Industrial dumping, particulate pollution from combustion engines, and agricultural fertilizers and pesticides can all end up in rivers and streams, either falling there directly or carried to the waterways by rain. Particularly toxic pollutants may wipe out an ecosystem entirely, but even small amounts of less lethal compounds can have an effect on wildlife. Some of these toxic substances can even cause altering the life cycle of fish, amphibians and other wildlife and causing birth defects that can destroy a population over time.

American Alligator

The American alligator ranges throughout the American southeast in freshwater marshes and rivers, where it basks by day and hunts by night. It is one of North America’s largest reptiles, growing as long as 18 feet. The American alligator can be distinguished from its relative the American crocodile by its round snout, darker color and the absence of visible teeth when the mouth is closed.
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Amazon River Dolphin

Also referred to as the Pink Porpoise, and the Pink Dolphin, this creature is the largest, most common and most widely distributed river dolphin in the world. Depending on age of the dolphin as well as water clarity, temperature and location, its body color may vary from a vivid pink to bluish gray or off-white.
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Hippopotamus

A large, mostly plant-eating mammal, the hippopotamus is found in rivers and lakes throughout Africa. The hippo is semiaquatic and thought to be more closely related to whales than to other hoofed animals. Adults can measure up to 11 feet long, stand 5 feet tall and weigh up to 1.5 tons. It has been known to live up to 45 years in the wild.

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