Renaissance

History magazine

Literary Geniuses

The writers of the Renaissance not only wanted to imitate art, they hoped to change reality through art. They reflected a spirit of exploration that was going on throughout the world. The Renaissance writers brought settings to life beyond the English borders. Writers also believed in the art of imitation, gravitating toward the Greek and Roman writers and writing styles.

Fun facts

- In 1593, Martin Luther's thirty nine articles we're published

- In 1606, The first recorded performances of Shakespeare's "King Lear" and Middleton's "The Revenger's Tragedy," takes place

- In 1642, The English Civil War commences and the Puritan Parliament bans the theatre and closed the play houses

Some of the popular play writers

Literature was everything

It brought people together and made the Renaissance time period. If it weren't for the talented play writers like Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Middleton and many more, British literature wouldn't be the gold we cherish today.

Where can you find British Literature?

Your local library, computer, or smart phone! And it's free!

What happened during the Renaissance?

January 1st, 1347 The Bubonic Plague Begins

The Black Plauge killed about 1.5 million people from the total 4 million in Europe in that time. Since there was no medical knowledge about the disease, there was no way of stopping it from spreading and killing.

January 1st, 1428 Joan of Arc and The Seige of Orleans

The Siege of Orléans (1428–1429) marked a turning point in the Hundred Years' War between France and England. This was Joan of Arc's first major[5] military victory and the first major French success to follow the crushing defeat at Agincourt in 1415.

January 1st, 1445 Johann Gutenberg Invents The Printing Press

Johann's invention of mechanical movable type printing started the Printing Revolution and is widely regarded as the most important event of the modern period.It played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment and the Scientific Revolution and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.

January 1st, 1492 Columbus Discovers the america's

At 2am on October 12th 1492, a sailor aboard the Pinta by the name of Rodrigo de Triana shouted, “Tierra! Tierra!” For his sighting of land, he should have received a yearly pension for the rest of his life. But the Admiral of the three-ship fleet would later tell his benefactors, Ferdinand and Isabella, that he had himself seen a light the evening before and claimed the reward for himself. Thus, inauspiciously, began Christopher Columbus’s “discovery” of the New World

January 1st, 1517 Martin Luther 95 thesis

The Ninety-Five Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences also known as, The Ninety-Five Theses, was written by Martin Luther, 1517 and is widely regarded as the primary catalyst for the Protestant Reformation. The disputation protests against clerical abuses, especially the sale of indulgences.

January 1st, 1424 Start of European wars of religion

The Ninety-Five Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences also known as, The Ninety-Five Theses, was written by Martin Luther, 1517 and is widely regarded as the primary catalyst for the Protestant Reformation. The disputation protests against clerical abuses, especially the sale of indulgences.

January 1st, 1543 Scientific revolution and Copernicus

The scientific revolution began in Europe towards the end of the Renaissance era and continued through the late 18th century, the later period known as The Enlightenment. It was sparked by the publication in 1543 of two works that changed the course of science: Nicolaus Copernicus's De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) and Andreas Vesalius's De humani corporis fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human body).

January 1st, 1558 cobra nation of queen Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I was crowned Queen. She was the third of Henry VIII’s children to become monarch and she was the last of the Tudor dynasty.Elizabeth had inherited the throne from her half-sister Mary I, who had died on the 17th November 1558.

January 1st, 1572 Saint Bartholomews massacre

The St. Bartholomew's Day massacre in 1572 was a targeted group of assassinations, followed by a wave of Roman Catholic mob violence, both directed against the Huguenots, during the French Wars of Religion. Traditionally believed to have been instigated by Catherine de' Medici. The Massacre is unknown to exactly how many deaths it caused, but the guess is anywhere between 5,000 and 30,000

January 1st, 1595 Da Vinci paints the last supper

A 15th century mural painting in Milan created by Leonardo da Vinci for his patron Duke Ludovico Sforza and his duchess Beatrice d'Este. It represents the scene of The Last Supper from the final days of Jesus as it is told in the Gospel of John 13:21, when Jesus announces that one of his Twelve Apostles would betray him

What was the culture like ?

The Renaissence culture was more than just the arts, like Michaelangelo and the Sistine chapel, or Da Vinchi and his Mona Lisa. It was a movement associated with the study of Ancient Greek and Latin works. The artists , sculptors and architects of the age looked back to old work of art and invented new techniques and new ways of representing the old ideas, classical works and as well as creating new ones. The Renaissance was full of new ideas. People were able to break away from church. The printing press allowed for greater access to literature and understanding of the bible. Religion was very tolerable during the Renaissence and the break from the church didn't mean that the people were separating themselves from religious teachings and ideas. During the Renaissence there was a large number of religious paintings and sculptures. The artists and architects allowed of the spirit and ideas of the Renaissence to be displayed in everyday life.