Toolbox Talks

TOOLBOX TALK # 11

Making Communication and Consultation Effective


WHY CONSULTATION IS IMPORTANT


By drawing on the knowledge and experience of your workers more informed decisions can be made about how work should be carried out safely.


A safe workplace is more easily acheived when everyone involved in the work communicates with each other to identify hazards and risks, talking about any health and safety concerns, while working together to find solutions.


WHAT IS EFFECTIVE CONSULTATION


Consultation is a two way process between you and your workers, where you:


TALK to each other about health and safety matters

LISTEN to their concerns and raise your concerns

SEEK and SHARE views and information; and

CONSIDER what your workers say before you make decisions


HOW TO CONSULT WITH WORKERS


Consultation with workers can be undertaken in various ways. It does not need to be a formal process and can be as simple as talking to workers regularly and considering their views when making health and safety decisions.


The following mechanisms are in place for consultation with workers:


Daily Toolbox Meetings - to be held on a daily basis.

Toolbox Talks - to be held at least on a regular fortnightly basis.

Project Management Meetings - to be held on at least a regular monthly basis.


The method and frequency of these meetings will stay in effect unless determined otherwise by site management.


WHEN TO CONSULT WITH WORKERS


* Identifying hazards and assessing risks arising form the work carried out or to be carried out;

* Making decisions about ways to eliminate or minimise those risks;

* Proposing changes that may affect the health or safety of our workers;

* Making decisions about:

- adequacy of facilities for the welfare of workers;
- procedures for consulting with workers;
- resolving health or safety issues;
- monitoring health of your workers;
- monitoring the conditions at the workplace; and
- providing information and training for workers.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 11

Workers provided topics for discussion:


  • PPE - fit for purpose
  • Kazac Workboot Allowance
  • Kazac Hi-Vis Summer Uniform
  • Plant Operator Competency Assessments (new operators)
  • Subcontractor Management
  • Kazac Site SWMS / Plant SWMS
  • Daily Plant Inspection Reports (completion - not ticking and flicking)
  • Fire Extinguisher availability (Plant)
  • Lifting Equipment - assigning lifting gear to respective plant




Steve and Karen Cusato

TOOLBOX TALK # 10 ( # 6 - REVISITED)

Incident Reporting

All employees, subcontractors, suppliers and visitors MUST report any incidents or hazard within 24hrs.


Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action, such as an Opportunity for Improvement Notice and/or a Non-Conformance Report being issued. These documents will be noted on your employee file.


ALL injuries / illness (ANY illness before starting work)

ALL near misses

ALL other incidents

ALL hazards


Reports are to be provided directly to the Site Foreman and/or WHS Officer (Kim Brown) and MUST be completed within 24hrs after incident.


The WHS Officer will peform an assessment to determine whether an investigation is required and if regulatory authorities are required to be informed.


An investigation will be conducted within 24hrs of the incident to identify the root causes, contributing factors, suitable controls and or corrective actions requried.


The corrective actions will then be implemented, monitored, reviewed and evaluated to determine their effectiveness.

Opportunity for Improvement Notice

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Non-Conformance Report

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TOOLBOX TALK # 9

Earlier this week one of our employees received a hand injury while driving a star pick in with a dolly. After doing an Accident Investigation it was determined that there were two reasons this injury happened


1. Rushing the task

2. Not wearing the correct PPE


The Kazac employee was lucky in this instance as the injury was of a small but deep wound resulting in no lost time at work. This could have been a very serious incident with the possibility of losing either a thumb or finger.


Hand injuries account for 80 percent of all occupational injuries. This is because the hands are engaged in almost all activities on the job.


What are some of the dangerous conditions on the job to which the hand can be exposed?


Some examples: Sharp edges, pinch points, protruding objects, splinters, exposed blades on unguarded machinery.


Pinch points are basically traps for the hand.


Handling sharp objects, hot objects, rough materials and splinters without the necessary hand protection are an invitation for hand injury.


Wear approved work gloves while doing “ALL” manual tasks. Not all gloves protect you from all hand

injuries.


DO NOT wear rings or wedding bands when working with machinery.


Use your brain. Wear your PPE.


Avoid dangers and protect your hands. You need them as long as you live.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 9

Workers provided no valuable feedback.


Steve & Karen Cusato

TOOLBOX TALK # 8

Heart Attacks / Strokes - KNOW THE SIGNS!!

This toolbox talk has been raised following the recent death of a 52-year-old man working on a Coorparoo construction site. None of the workers at the site recognised the man's symptoms, including feeling pain radiating down his left arm and a general feeling of unwellness, as heart attack symptoms.


A heart attack happens when there is a sudden complete blockage of an artery that supplies blood to an area of your heart. As a result, some of your heart muscle begins to die - without early medical treatment, this can be life-threatening or lead to permanent damage.


The signs of a heart attack can vary from person to person. However, common symptoms reported from those suffering a heart attack symptoms can include:


- nausea

- shortness of breath

- dizziness

- cold sweat

- pain, pressure, heaviness or tightness in one or more parts of the chest, neck, jaw, arm, shoulders or back


In addition to the above, symptoms typically related to a stroke can include loss of strength, balance, feeling or speech down one side of the body.


There is only a small amount of time to act before permanent damage to the heart muscle which can happen within three to four minutes of being starved of oxygen.


If a worker is suspected of suffering from a heart attack, this should be dealt with as an immediate medical emergency.


If you suspect that you, or someone you work with, could be having a heart attack or stroke, call Triple Zero (000) ask for an ambulance and render appropriate first aid until the ambulance arrives.


Dealing with medical emergencies such as a heart attack is an important part of a business' workplace health and safety management system and first aid requirements.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 8

Workers provided no additional feedback


Steve & Karen Cusato

TOOLBOX TALK # 7

Grinders and Abrasive Saws

*** WARNING ... graphic photograph below ***


Grinders and abrasive saws are common on a construction site or in an industrial shop. Many injuries occur due to improper use and maintenance of these useful tools. There are many important safety factors. Here are a few to consider:


- Read the manufacturer’s instructions which will include all pertinent safety information. If you do not have a copy, your employer should be able to supply you with one.


- Visually inspect the tool prior to using. Is the abrasive wheel chipped or cracked?


- Make sure the grinding wheel or saw has a higher maximum rated speed than the maximum motor speed of the tool. The majority of injuries result from catastrophic failure while the wheel is spinning at high speeds. If it is a new wheel, give it a quick test run. Spin it for 1 minute at maximum speed prior to cutting anything. Do not stand in front of the wheel during this test.


- Make sure all guards and shields are in place and in good working order. Do not operate a grinder or saw that is missing guards or shields.


- Grinding operations typically spray sparks within the work area. Check for combustibles within the area before beginning any work. Make sure to direct sparks away from yourself and others.


- Consider the material you are cutting / grinding. Are there any exposure hazards with inhaling the fumes or dust of the material? Proper respiratory protection must be worn if there is a respiratory hazard.


- Always wear a face shield and safety glasses when using a grinder, as well as work gloves and hearing protection.


- Make sure long hair is tied up, dangling jewelry is removed and baggy clothing is avoided. Entanglement is a major cause of injuries with grinders and abrasive saws.


- Unplug the grinder before changing cutting heads.

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FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 7

Workers provided no additional feedback


Steve & Karen Cusato

TOOLBOX TALK # 6

Incident Reporting

All employees, subcontractors, suppliers and visitors MUST report any incidents or hazard within 24hrs.


Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action.


ALL injuries / illness (ANY illness before starting work)

ALL near misses

ALL other incidents

ALL hazards


Reports are to be provided directly to the Site Foreman / WHS Manager and MUST be completed within 24hrs after incident.


The WHS Manager will peform an assessment to determine whether an investigation is required and if regulatory authorities are required to be informed.


An investigation will be conducted within 24hrs of the incident to identify the root causes, contributing factors, suitable controls and or corrective actions requried.


The corrective actions will then be implemented, monitored, reviewed and evaluated to determine their effectiveness.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 6

Workers provided no additional feedback


Steve & Karen Cusato

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TOOLBOX TALK # 5

Heavy Plant Recovery


Incident Details


Grader # 22 slipped down an earth bank and required to be pulled out


Excavator # 19 went to assist in the recovery with a tow chain, in an attempt to tow the grader


The tow chain failed due to tension, snapping a link and resulting with the hook shooting into the windscreen of the excavator, just missing the operator

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Heavy Plant Recovery - Safe Work Procedure


1. All persons involved MUST have read and signed the SWMS BEFORE works commences


2. Ask management and senior operators for advice and assistance PRIOR to recovery

3. Assess the risks for ways to recover the plant


  • use approved sling
  • digging out
  • use implement (blade / bucket) to reposition the machine


4. Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) MUST be completed for the scope of works,

BEFORE starting the task, if the work to be performed is not detailed in the SWMS.

All persons involved MUST participate in the creation of the JSEA


5. Spotters MUST be used at all times when recovering bogged plant


6. Material slings MUST be used when recovering bogged plant (Chains MUST NOT be used)


7. Be aware of the dangers of whipping slings / chains.

Place bag / t-shirt, or the like over sling at halfway point to prevent backlash


8. Stand clear of tow sling when under tension (10m radius for exclusion zone)


9. Maintain constant / positive communication between operators and spotters

(UHF Channel 14)


10. If leaving machine unattended - shut off motor, apply park brake and put into gear to prevent unplanned movement.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 5

Worker suggestions included preventative, detective and corrective controls to manage the recovery of heavy plant


  • checking the ground condition prior to starting and corrective controls
  • ensuring each job site has a recovery sling kept in the site office

Steve & Karen Cusato

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TOOLBOX TALK # 4

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Three Points of Contact

This information has been developed to manage the risks associated with the safe access and egress of plant.


The three-points of contact system means three of your four limbs are in contact with the equipment you are climbing at all times – two hands and one foot or two feet and one hand.


This system allows the person to have maximum stability and support, thereby reducing the likelihood of slipping and falling.

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Entering and Exiting a Vehicle - Safe Work Procedure

For safety there is a procedure for entering and exiting a vehicle


To ENTER the vehicle the driver must check for traffic before moving out from the line of the vehicle and again before opening the door. When entering the vehicle the driver must use available steps and grab handles to climb into the vehicle, maintaining three points of contact at ALL times.


To EXIT the vehicle the driver must check again for traffic before opening the door. When exiting the vehicle the driver MUST exit facing the vehicle using available steps and grabs (not jumping) while maintaining three points

of contact

DO’S


  • Wear shoes with good support - not sandals or bare feet etc.
  • Clean mud and other slippery substances off your shoes before climbing
  • Slow down and use extra caution
  • Enter and exit facing the cab
  • Face the cab with your body centered between the rails when climbing or exiting
  • Get a firm grip on rails or handles with your hands
  • Grasp the rungs in a hand over hand manner
  • Look for obstacles on the ground below before exiting i.e. uneven ground


DON’TS


  • DO NOT rush this often results in only two-points of contact - descend slowly, to avoid straining a muscle
  • DO NOT climb down with something in your free hand - place it on the vehicle floor and reach up for it when you get down on the ground
  • DO NOT use tyres or wheel hubs as a step surface
  • DO NOT use the doorframe or door edge as a handhold
  • DO NOT jump from cab


ANKLE, KNEE AND BACK INJURIES ARE THE MOST COMMON INJURIES WHEN DISMOUNTING PLANT


  • DO NOT become an injury statistic

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX # 4


Workers pointed out the functionality of the labels to be used. Suggested to have the warning signs printed on vinyl as would be longer lasting then the printed labels currently in use.


Workers also discussed current issues identified on site. The issues raised will be discussed in future toolbox topics.


  • Keeping off wheels when checking oil
  • Parking trucks in bund. Fundamentally stable park


Steve & Karen Cusato

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TOOLBOX TALK # 3

Procedural Reporting of Mechanical Faults / Repairs on Plant and Vehicles

1. Fault / repairs detected to plant operators


2. Report fault / repairs to Site Foreman


3. Report fault / repairs to Mike Kennard 0405 643 316


4. Note fault / repairs on Daily Plant Inspection Checklist (DPI)


5. Mike to determine when the fault is to be fixed depending on the nature of the issue


6. Mike to action repairs and sign the DPI to confirm the fault has been repaired


7. Mike to note repair in daily docket book with the DPI #


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DPI's MUST be submitted to the office on a weekly basis


Cathy to match up DPI's to Mike's docket book and update the service record for each plant


Any faults not reported will be brought to Mike's attention by supplying a copy of the DPI


Cathy to perform weekly checks to ensure all DPI for plant in use are returned to the office


Cathy will highlight to the Site Foreman omitted forms

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 3

Workers raised the issue of the DPI not being completed consistently on a daily basis and in instances where plant operators are being swapped around between machines, the DPI has not been completed by the previous operator.


PLEASE ENSURE THAT IF YOU ARE THE OPERATOR ON A MACHINE THAT THE DPI IS COMPLETED ON THE DAY.


Steve & Karen Cusato

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TOOLBOX TALK # 2

Authority to Perform Works for Other Companies

This safety control measure has been implemented to eliminate and or minimise as far as is reasonably practicable the risks to the health and safety of Kazac Civil employees, when

performing work activities for companies other than Kazac Civil.


NO employee of Kazac Civil is to provide any assistance to subcontractors or Kazac Civil employees, when loading and or unloading plant on a worksite.


NO employee of Kazac Civil holds the authority to perform any work activities for any company other than Kazac Civil, without express authority and permission from your Site Foreman.


NOTE: any activity that is performed on a regular basis for a Supplier, such as unloading pipes, pits etc MUST be noted on your Safe Work Method Statement.


This administrative control is effective immediately and is now standard practice for all current and future work sites.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 2

Peter White raised issue regarding deliveries on site for materials such as pipes, manholes etc.

It has been identified that the procedure for taking such deliveries is not documented in the Kazac Civil Safe Work Method Statement.

As such, this will now be amended to ensure all future SWMS cover this scenario.


Steve & Karen Cusato

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TOOLBOX TALK # 1

Duty of Care on a Construction Site

People working near water or sewer main infrastructure have a duty of care to ensure that infrastructure in the area is not damaged, or interfered with, and their work does not present a hazard to workers or public.


This duty of care is exercised through careful planning of the works and compliance with various requirments and conditions. While Kazac Civil Pty Ltd will provide plans, information and assistance where appropriate, the responsibility for ensuring the work does not interefere with water and sewer infrastructure and is conducted in a safe manner, remains with the party conducting the work.


Any damage caused, including potentionally any consequential damages, is the responsibility of the party that caused the damage.


People working near Kazac Civil Pty Ltd sewer and pipelines must positively verify the location of all the pipelines, pits, pit lids, likely to be affected by their works. "positively verify" means to pothole by hand or by other soft dig method or visually inspect and prove the pipeline location visually, and place visable markers such as barrier tape, bunting or pegs to be visable to operators around area not to be entered or crossed.

FEEDBACK TOOLBOX TALK # 1

Nil feedback received.


Steve & Karen Cusato

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Toolbox Talk Consultation Process

  • Toolbox Talks will be delivered on site by WHS Officer Kim Brown.
  • All workers are encouraged to provide feedback and comments during the delivery of the toolbox.
  • When all employees have been notified a Toolbox Talk flyer (with feedback included) will be sent via email or post.


NOTE: These Toolbox Talks are in addition to the Daily Toolbox / Prestart Meetings that you have each day with your Site Foreman.


Any questions, please speak to your Site Foreman

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