WSISD Curriculum & Instruction

3rd Six Weeks Newsletter

DOING DATA RIGHT

As we reflect on our most recent assessment data and help students set individualized goals, it is imperative that we ask ourselves the following question:


ARE WE MOTIVATING OR DEMOTIVATING STUDENTS WITH DATA???


How do teachers commonly examine data with their students?

What does research tell us about how these practices are likely to affect student motivation?


Performance Orientation vs. Mastery Orientation

A performance orientation directs students' attention to grades and achievement and encourages them to compare themselves with others. Performance-oriented goals are generally associated with negative student outcomes. Although some students may be motivated by a performance orientation, others may balk at difficult tasks and give up when faced with difficulty.


A mastery orientation, in which students focus on developing new skills and improving their competence, is associated with self-regulation, increased effort, autonomy, and the belief that effort will lead to academic success. Teachers foster a mastery orientation when they focus on individual improvement, recognize and reward effort, evaluate students privately, involve students in decision making, foster students' sense of responsibility and independence, provide meaningful and interesting learning activities, and encourage students to set short-term, self-referenced goals.


Teachers that promote a mastery orientation use the following practices:


1.) Embrace a learning perspective- a belief that examining and reflecting on data will help students identify weaknesses, what contributes to them, and plan for how they can address gaps.


2.) Focus on growth-related information, articulating a clear relationship between effort and outcomes and encourage students to consider their progress.


3.) Share individual-level data privately with students in ways that focus student attention on how they are performing relative to their own past performance or how close they are to reaching standards.


4.) Sometimes uses intangible rewards like praise and discussion of positive results to emphasize key messages about progress.


5.) Involves students in analysis, goal setting, and follow-up. Students are given opportunities to graph their own results and identify topics on which to focus their reflection.


6.) Supports students' next steps. In whole-group or individual interventions, teachers do not simply repeat the same content and approach but instead try multiple ways to reteach material.

RIGOR & RELEVANCE - INCORPORATING QUADRANT "D" LEARNING EXPERIENCES DAILY

15 Days until Christmas Break...MAXIMIZE YOUR INSTRUCTIONAL MINUTES

Now is the prime learning time for our students. Ensure that your daily lessons are intentional and that your students are actively engaged in the learning process and storing information into long-term memory. Utilize the Rigor & Relevance Framework to monitor your own progress in adding rigor and relevance to your daily instruction and to help you when selecting appropriate instructional strategies for differentiating instruction and facilitating higher achievement goals. "D" moments are short strategies within a daily lesson utilized to create student thinking and application into Quadrant "D" of R/R Framework.
Big image

DOES EVERY STUDENT KNOW WHAT THEY ARE LEARNING AND WHY?

"The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that whether we win or lose, we have applied the best of ourselves to the task at hand."

~Vince Lombardi