Journalists & The Great War

tried, tested, and transformed

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Tried: 1914 - 1918

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Daily News

August 27, 1914 - The front page of The Toronto Daily Star ("Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse Sunk").
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One month after I sent my boys off to war and five days after the censors. The censors weren't that bad, actually. Can't say the same about the Hun-lovin' newspapers, though, but it's probably better that way (Basen).

With the war, newspaper sales have gone up. Heh, I'm getting a $0.10 raise tomorrow because of them. Thank the rich cowards sitting cozy in their homes, they're the real heroes. Might as well enjoy the spoils of war while it lasts.

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The Dead Horse Corner

October, 1915 - The Dead Horse Corner Gazette was a newspaper written by soldiers and published by the 4th Battalion ("The Dead Horse Corner Gazette").
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My wife showed this to me while coming home from the factory. I've seen a couple of these boys walking to work. Trench newspapers: Written and published by Canucks overseas ("Trench Culture").

They're brutal compared to what my Mail and Empire men write, but it's can be fairly humorous at times. It's certainly superior to the hard tack they write at The Globe. Although, Borden toughened up the censors recently, so how this managed to be passed is beyond me.

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Rations

1917 - The front page of a booklet distributed to Canadian citizens by the Food Controller for Canada ("Front page of a booklet issued by").
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My wife and I were checking the mailbox. Quick firers from my boys; no letters. My wife picked up this booklet from the mail. We haven't eaten anything aside from fish and potatoes this month. Food's getting more expensive by the week and my last raise was three years ago.

Ah! I'm in charge of the War Meals section of the paper next week. My wife and girls can come up with the recipes. I'm sure it'll taste good. But I do miss good food... and my boys (
"Food, Fuel, and Inflation").

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Victory Debt

1917 - Poster urging Canadians to purchase Victory Bonds located on College Street in Toronto, Ontario ("WWI Victory Bonds poster").
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Victory bonds were recently introduced and all my men at The Mail and Empire are getting some. My girls have been begging me to buy more. The government is running out of money and my boys need all the help they can get. I can't let them fight in vain and have those filthy Huns running over my country!

With Borden taking away our liquor, I can't afford to go to America and go rum running. Speakeasies don't come cheap, either (Hallowell). I may as well help my boys overseas while earning an extra 5.5% interest (Morton).

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THE GREAT DIVIDE

May 24th, 1917 - French-Canadians from Montréal, Quebec rallying against conscription ("Anti-conscription rally").
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Looks like Borden is planning to introduce conscription. My family, friends, and everyone I know seems to support it, except for some farmers and those disloyal immigrants ("Recruitment and Conscription"). But I don't mind the opposition. A controversy is always good for business. More sales, more money, and maybe a raise.

Speaking of which, a telegram just arrived. It appears the French cowards are protesting against conscription in Montr
éal. Nothing this exciting ever happens in Canada. This is headline news! I'm sure to earn a raise today!

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DISTRUST

1917 - Written by Philip Gibbs and published by The Globe.

"Canadian Army Smashes Forward Through Passchendaele Village - One of the Most Signal Triumphs Won by Them During The War - Possession of Village Big Step toward command of entire Ridge, which will relegate Germans to Lower Levels Eastward - one of the Biggest Achievements of the War." (Gibbs)

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Many of my friends and I used to read American newspapers once in a while to see what happens overseas. I guess I can't anymore as they joined the war and placed censors on their papers (Basen). Where am I going to find real news? I mean, look at this! Canada triumphs Passchendaele? I highly doubt it. I highly doubt this war will end in the near or distant future.

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Suffrage

1917 - Canadian Bluebirds voting for the first time in a federal election (Wafulz).
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Borden stacked the election in his favour and everyone knows it. He took pro-conscription Liberals to join his party, he allowed my wife and daughters to vote, and stopped the pacifists and enemy aliens from voting (English). There is no chance of the Liberals winning and the Union Government losing. I don't like the idea of my girls voting, however I don't like the idea of a Liberal government either.

Although, I sense the French cowards will be very loyal to the Liberals for a very long time.

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Armistice of Compiègne Signed!

November 11, 1918 - Front page of New York Times after the Armistice of Compiègne was signed, marking the end of the Great War (Maksim).
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The war is over at last! It's been over a year since my family has seen my boys. Good riddance.

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TESTED: 1919 - 1923

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No jobs. No money. No mercy.

June 21, 1919 - The RCMP charged towards the crowd during the Winnipeg Riots, resulting in 30 casualties and 1 death ("Winnipeg Riot").
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My boys didn't come back to war to for this mess. My wife and I have been working, but it's not enough and there are no jobs to be found for our sons. Everything is pricier, jobs are becoming more scarce, and my boys were planning to join a protest.

From what I heard from my men, the strike in Winnipeg was a mess. Ten of the leaders were arrested. Ottawa became involved, then the Mounties rammed into the crowd, and the militia brought their machine guns. Nothing was accomplished, either. (Reilly).

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The Spanish Flu

October 1919 - Nurses from High River, Alta, wearing face masks to protect themselves from the Spanish Flu pandemic ("Influenza").
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God's wrath is upon us. I've lost a few of my men to this flu. Walking to work, every person I've seen has been reduced to wearing a face mask. Everyone once in a while, I would see a blue person walking down the street; their life measured in hours. My wife and children are safe at home. I wish I could do the same, but the prices aren't getting any lower. At least there will be plenty of jobs once the storm blows over (Bailey).

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Flappers

Late 1921 - Clara Bow, an American silent film actress, in a magazine shot (Stovelsten). Flappers are characterized by their disregard for social norms during the time period, such as wearing sleeveless dresses or having bobbed their hair.
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One of my men recently wrote an article on flappers and how they are becoming increasingly common amongst the newer generation. This concerns me. I don't want my daughters to think showing off skin is perfectly acceptable, and my wife certainly agrees (Quinlan et al. 70).

Nevertheless, these "flappers" are still quite taboo. I shouldn't be overly concerned.

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Liberal Leader

December 6, 1921 - William Lyon Mackenzie King, the leader of the Liberal Party, was elected to be the Prime Minister of Canada ("King, William Lyon Mackenzie").
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With the Liberals and the conscription ordeal, I'd never thought I see a Liberal government in the next 30 years of my life. I welcome the change, seeing as the country wasn't getting any better under those foolish Conservatives. In my opinion, though, his personality and charisma is a tad lackluster (Pickersgill). My men at the Daily Star also seem share my opinion. It's unfortunate I'm not in charge of an editorial this week.

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Radio

1922 - Radio advertisement for Freed-Eisemann radios found in Radio World magazine ("Crystal Radio Advertisement").
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The head of the Toronto Daily Star showed a radio, a rich man's toy. My men were circling around it, sharing earphones with each other. Only American broadcasts can be heard. The XWA in Montréal owns a radio station. Vancouver, Edmonton, and Winnipeg owns a radio station. Why shouldn't we own a radio station? This should give us an edge over The Globe (Quinlan et al. 50)!

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Transformed: 1924 - 1929

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Markets Booming!

1925 - Canadian Pacific Railway train cars at Canmore Mines in Alberta ("CPR Train Cars").
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The economy is beginning to turn for the better. In the Prairies, the wheat crops are growing exceptionally well. Many jobs available for supplying newspaper and magazines for our neighbours down South. Mines are opening all throughout the country, mining nickel, copper, zinc, and oil (Quinlan et al. 59).

My wife and I gave our boys our farewells. Moving away from the city and working the nickel mines can be excruciating.
They've served five years overseas and came back in one piece, however. My boys aren't boys anymore, they're men.

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King-Byng Affair

September 14, 1926 - Governor General Lord Julian Bying of Vimy ("Byng of Vimy, Viscount").
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Draft #1

Toronto, September 14 — The Liberals have taken a majority of the seats in the House with sitting at 128 seats. William Lyon Mackenzie King will, once again, serve as Canada's Prime Minister.

On September 1915, When a motion of censure was introduced to the Liberal Party, King put forward a motion to dissolve the government and call for an election; it was refused by
Governor General Lord Julian Byng of Vimy. Bying instead called for the Conservatives to form a minority government and King stepped down from his role of Prime Minister. After losing a parliamentary vote one year later, Arthur Meighen asked for the parliament to be dissolved and an for an election, which Byng granted (Forsey).

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Culture: Flappers and Jazz

Late 1920s - The Charleston performed at the Folies-Bergère, Paris by Josephine Baker.
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Flappers. They're everywhere. Many of the people in the city have began to accept them as part of "the norm". I don't mind the new fashion trends for men, they're flattering. However, young ladies everywhere are wearing sleeveless dresses, shorter skirts, and showing more skin. One of my daughters bought a flapper dress yesterday. Whatever happened to common decency (Quinlan et al. 70)?

One thing this generation was correct about is its music. I recently had the opportunity to go to
The Gilbert Watson Orchestra with one of my son and the music was phenomenal. The American soloist in particular, I do believe his name was Curtis Little, changed my initial view of jazz with his performance. (Hale).

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Flying Santa

December 25, 1927 - Roméo Vachon moments before Canada's first airmail flight
("Roméo Vachon prior").
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One of my men shared that the first airmail flight took off a few hours ago. It's a Christmas miracle! It's about time Canada had airmail! America and the countries overseas had airmail ever since the war ended. The Liberals finally realized that if we're not doing airmail on our own soil, someone else will; that someone else better not be Americans ("Changes on the Horizon").

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Black Tuesday

October 25, 1929 - Crowd of people on Wall Street after the stock market crash (Mavictor).
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Stress. Panic. Dread. An accurate description of every man and woman in Canada. My men at the Toronto Daily Star were panicking trying to publish a newspaper before the Globe this morning. Later, everyone began to sell their stocks out of panic. Investing that money in the stock market appeared to be good on paper, but it appears we were proven wrong. Fortunately, I haven't invested very much into stocks, aside from the money redeemed from Victory Bonds. Still, ten years worth of savings down the sewers. Although, many of my men and neighbours have more to lose than just savings (Hillmer). We may be reliving the post-war days once again.

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