Tuesdays With Morrie

by Mitch Albom

Author's Purpose

The author's purpose for writing this story is to explain that there are many more things to life than wealth and prestige. It explains that love conquers all in life and to look back on your life and realize what you need to be living for.

Textual References

"Forgive yourself. Forgive others. Don't wait, Mitch. Not everyone gets the time I'm getting. Not everyone is as lucky." (page 167)


"Death ends life, not a relationship." (page 174)


"Invest in the human family. Invest in people. Build a little community of those you love and who love you." (page 157)


"Everybody knows they're going to die, but nobody believes it. If we did, we we would do things differently." (page 81)

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Synopsis

Mitch was a young freshman in college, graduating his senior year of high school. He tried many things to act older than he actually was, such as, going to the gym every day and keep an unlit cigarette in his mouth as he walked around campus. Mitch took his first sociology class with Morrie as the professor and he really appreciated him as a teacher because he had befriended him. Mitch decided to take all of the classes that Morrie taught until he graduated. At graduation, he promised they would keep in touch over the years. Though Mitch hasn't seen his beloved professor in 16 years. He was too busy being caught up in work. Finally, when he hears about the disease (ALS) that Morrie has, he decides that visiting him is a must. Mitch has started to visit Morrie every Tuesday and each Tuesday, they decide, is a different lesson about life. Each time Mitch visits his old “coach”, Morrie’s condition is worse and worse. Morrie can’t handle the same things he used to do, such as wiping himself and chewing. His life gradually decreases over time until he finally suffocates while lying in his bed, his family in the kitchen. Overall, Mitch's lessons with Morrie recently has taught him that love conquers all in life and there’s more to life than caring for yourself.

Presentation by Nicholas Blalock