►Therapeutic Cloning◄

How cloning affects humans

EQ

Should human cloning be allowed?

Cloning is Possible

In the modern world we live in, we are allowed to clone living creatures, and possibly even humans. Only veterans of the science have succeeded yet, but people are doing it. In some states, people are deciding whether they should be able to clone or not. Recently in California and Missouri, there have polls that have changed state laws, allowing scientists to clone humans beings and letting people have the right to stem cell therapies and cures.

Some Creatures who have been Cloned:

Cloning can be Good

Some Pros of Cloning:

  1. People can be cured of diseases and illnesses.
  2. Scientists can study more diseases that humans can get.
  3. People can create clones of loved ones who have passed.
  4. They can make longer and better (less sick) lives of people who are not blessed with health.
  5. They can be used to advance modern science even farther.

Cloning can also be bad

Some Cons of Cloning:

  1. When clones are used for medical purposes, people are destroying a living creature.
  2. When cloning doesn't work, the clone dies.
  3. If that isn't bad enough, it ends up being a waste of time and money.
  4. If a clone used for transplant has an unknown defect, it can seriously harm the patient.
  5. Beliefs of cloning can cause large disagreement, which can lead to stuff a government doesn't want to deal with.

Answer to EQ

There is no one right answer. Lots of people think human cloning is ethical, lots don't. Neither is right, neither is wrong. Human cloning can be very helpful to the human, but hurtful to the clone. People believe what they believe, even when it comes to cloning.

Bibilography

Brock, Dan W. "Research Cloning Is Ethical." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research." Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38.2 (Summer 2010): 229-237. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2015.


"“CC” The First Cloned Cat." UPI Photo Collection. 2010. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.


"Dolly, the first cloned mammal." Animal Rights. Kim Masters Evans. Detroit: Gale, 2007. Information Plus Reference Series. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.

Economist, The. "Reproductive Cloning Is Immoral." The Ethics of Human Cloning. Ed. John Woodward. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2005. At Issue. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.


Foley, Elizabeth Price. "The United States Should Not Ban Human Cloning." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "The Constitutional Implications of Human Cloning." Arizona Law Review 43.2 (11 June 2011): 16-46. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2015.


Kass, Leon R. "The United States Should Ban Reproductive Cloning and Place a Moratorium on Research Cloning." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Defending Life and Dignity: How, Finally, to Ban Human Cloning." The Weekly Standard 13.23 (25 Feb. 2008). Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2015.


"The process used to clone Dolly the sheep." Genetics and Genetic Engineering. Barbara Wexler. Detroit: Gale, 2007. Information Plus Reference Series. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.


Saunders, William, David Prentice, and Michael Fragoso. "Research Cloning Is Not Ethical." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "False Promises: Common Cloning Claims Refuted." Family Research Council Brochure. Family Research Council, 2008. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2015.