Strength & Conditioning Specialist

Dylan Hess

Occupation and Description

Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist or (cscs) are trained professionals that use their knowledge of the human anatomy to help train athlete on the purpose of making them better. (NSCA)

Certifications Necessary to Practice

To become a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist you have to an Bachelor degree (BS/BA) or a chiropractic medicine degree and to be certified in CPR and AED.

(NSCA)

Nature of the Work

A Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist have two primary goals the first is to improve athletes performances which means improving their speed, strength, and their power the second goal is to reduce injuries to athletes. CSCS create workout plans that target body parts that are prone to injuries in certain sports by including them in their plan or by showing the proper way to lift or do an activity. (HumanKinetics)

Education

To become a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist you have to an Bachelor degree (BS/BA) or a chiropractic medicine degree and to be certified in CPR and AED.

(NSCA)

Average Payday

The average pay for a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist is $40,000 to $60,000 a year and those whom work at professional level can make $100,000 a year. (HumanKinetics)

Skills Needed

These specialist have many skills because of the different athletes or program they work with so they have to skills motivating people because some athletes get bored of the workout and stop trying they also have to be detail oriented because they have to keep track of what they athletes needs and what the program needs, they also have to be a good teacher because they are teaching athletes how to lift or run the correct way to avoid injury. these are only a few of the many skills a specialist needs to have. (HumanKinetics)

Practice Setting: Where do they work.

A Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist can work in a high school teaching athletes how to lift and making workout plans for them to the professional level in football to soccer working with men and women to perform better in their sports. (HumanKinetics)

Job Outlook

The job market for strength and conditioning coaches is brisk but tough. There is competition for this job from colleges to professional sports. It is very difficult to get a job because most get hired because they have worked with another well respected strength and conditioning specialists/coach.(HumanKinetics)