Uday Joshi Massachusetts

Master of Water Resources

Uday Joshi Massachusetts: A Double Degree

Uday Joshi has devoted much of his life to higher education. He is an extremely accomplished man who today is an ALJ and Hearing Examiner. He has a double degree in Environmental Sciences and International Relations, a Master of Water Resources, and a Juris Doctor with a Specialty in Natural Resources Law.. He also consults on business start-ups, and drafts operating agreements for LLCs, and crafts investor contracts."


Uday V. Joshi of Massachusetts has made his home in New Mexico for the last fourteen years. He received his law degree from the University of New Mexico Law School. He also received his Master of Water Resources from that institution, and received them both in 2004, graduating with Distinction for his Master of Water Resources achievements. Before that he was a student at The American University in Washington, DC, where he earned Bachelor of Arts degrees in 1998. That is where he earned his double degree: Uday Joshi of Massachusetts studied Environmental Sciences and International Studies.


His educational background has one other accomplishment of note. From January to May of 1997, Uday V. Joshi was a student at the Universidad de los Andes in Merida, Venezuela. He undertook an independent study project, conducting an ethnographic field study of the indigenous Pemon and the development of eco-tourism and land use in the region. He wrote, in Spanish, a paper entitled "Eco-turismo orTurismo de Aventura."


Uday Joshi of Massachusetts speaks English, Spanish and Marathi. He is committed to creating financial incentives through the modernization of water storage, delivery and its use in economic development.

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Uday Joshi Massachusetts: Delivering Clean Water

Uday Joshi studied Natural and Cultural Ecology and Environmental Science and International Relations during his college years, and received a postgraduate Master degree in Water Resources and Juris Doctor from the University of New Mexico in 2004. Issues of water, watershed health and water yield augmentation, and modern water infrastructure in the United States are important to him.


Clean water, he believes, is arguably our single most important natural resource. Without water there is no life. So getting clean potable water to everyone who requires it is of utmost importance. Current data, as Uday V. Joshi of Massachusetts knows, indicates that millions of Americans are living without access to safe drinking water. The Bureau of Reclamation, within the United States Department of the Interior, is developing six projects that are meant to deliver fresh and safe drinking water to specific communities in the Western part of the country.


The first priority for funding rural water projects, says Uday Joshi of Massachusetts, is developing public-private partnerships to finance such projects. Of note, Reclamation allocated rural water construction dollars for Fiscal Year 2015 in six categories. That process also took into consideration the ability of the projects to complete segments that would result in delivering potable water to their residents.


Uday V. Joshi also advocates for refurbishing the nation's water infrastructure. He is a fourteen-year resident of New Mexico, where he is where he helps administer water resources. His legal and scientific background allows him to navigate the supply and demand of water in the state, with a focus on its financial requirements and benefits and the public welfare.

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Uday Joshi Massachusetts: The Water Infrastructure

Uday Joshi has lived and worked in New Mexico for fourteen years. He is known to family and friends as a sincere, intelligent and dignified man. He is a graduate of the University of New Mexico School of Law, where he received his law degree in 2004. That same year he also received his Master of Water Resources degree from the University of New Mexico and graduated with distinction.


Since the Fall of 2004 , Uday V. Joshi of Massachusetts has helped administer water resources. Water resources use and development has been a big concern of his for many years. He hopes to use his skill set to foster the development and modernization of water storage and conveyance and the rebuilding of city's water infrastructures to reduce water loss.


Water loss, he says, means economic loss. As the country moves further into the 21st century, Uday Joshi and other water resource authorities say that the nation's drinking water infrastructure is nearing the end of its life cycle and is in need of an upgrade. If every pipe in the infrastructure were replaced, the cost over the next few decades would exceed one trillion dollars, according to the American Water Works Association. That is a staggering number by any measure. But many of the pipes and water mains throughout the country are more than one hundred years old, so it is only a matter of time.


For now, as Uday Joshi of Massachusetts is pleased to suggest that the quality of the drinking water in the United States is very high, and outbreaks of disease associated with it are rare.


At the dawn of the 21st century, much of our drinking water infrastructure is nearing the end of its useful life. There are an estimated 240,000 water main breaks per year in the United States. Assuming every pipe would need to be replaced, the cost over the coming decades could reach more than $1 trillion, according to the American Water Works Association (AWWA). The quality of drinking water in the United States remains universally high, however. Even though pipes and mains are frequently more than 100 years old and in need of replacement, outbreaks of disease attributable to drinking water are rare and create preventable water losses.

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Uday Joshi Massachusetts: Trout Unlimited

Uday Joshi has lived in New Mexico for fourteen years, where he is focused on natural resource issues and is an avid fly fisherman. He is a member of Trout Unlimited, a national organization that is committed to conservation of trout as a species and a resource, by protecting the nation's coldwater fisheries and their watersheds from environmental threats.


Trout Unlimited is aided by lawyers, policy experts and scientists who keep the organization at the forefront of fisheries restoration at the local, state, and national levels. As Uday V. Joshi of Massachusetts knows, Trout Unlimited wants to ensure plentiful populations of trout for future generations so that they will be able to enjoy healthy fisheries in their home waters.


Uday Joshi is one of about 150,000 Trout Unlimited members, each of whom is dedicated to protecting coldwater fisheries in North America. Trout Unlimited members work across the country to protect, restore, and sustain the habitats of trout and other fish like salmon. They believe in the importance of a connection between healthy, intact fish habitats and the angling opportunity.


As Uday Joshi of Massachusetts knows, Trout Unlimited uses a scientific approach to protecting the spawning habitats for trout and salmon, reconnecting tributaries with their rivers. The organization also advocates for sustainable conservation priorities, and promotes a robust legal and regulatory framework to protect fish.


As a nonprofit organization, Trout Unlimited relies on its members like Uday Joshi of Massachusetts, and on countless generous donors to make their work possible. They believe in the importance of giving back to the resource they value so much, and that has provided them with so much.

Uday Joshi Massachusetts - Water Storage

Uday Joshi is an authority on water, and its allocation as a natural resource. He helps administer water resources, and also holds a Master of Water Resources and Juris Doctor degree from the University of New Mexico. He has lived in New Mexico for fourteen years.


He strives to be known as someone who can and will present the financial incentives that can be realized through the modernization of water storage and delivery. Water storage is an increasingly important issue in the United States, particularly in the west. As he knows, when it comes to tracking the water supply, measurement is key, because you cannot manage what you don't measure. But that is only the starting point.


Modern methods of measurement, which means satellite imagery, remote sensing, sensor networks, and computer models, allows water management authorities to measure water use by agriculture, native vegetation, and urban landscapes, all without having more reporting by water users. It is a cost effective method but the infrastructure and interagency efforts to get the most out of it are not yet in place.

Uday V. Joshi of Massachusetts believes it is time to modernize the water rights system, in order to make the most water available to the greatest number of users and uses, particularly during times of drought.


Uday Joshi of Massachusetts studied Natural and Cultural Ecology at the Universidad de los Andes in Venezuela. He has a double degree in Environmental Sciences and International Relations from The American University in Washington, D.C. and a Master of Water Resources and law degree from the University of Mexico School of Law, which he received in 2004.

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Uday Joshi Massachusetts - An Education

Uday Joshi became intrigued with New Mexico when he went to the University of New Mexico. He graduated there with a master in Water Resources, and then went on to go to the University of New Mexico School of Law in Albuquerque. There, he got a Juris Doctor, and graduated with honors with the Natural Resources Certificate. It was there that his passion for laws concerning the water supply grew.


But it didn’t start there. At the beginning, Uday Joshi Massachusetts decided to start at the beginning. He started by attending the Universidad de los Andes in Venezuela, through the school of international training. While he was there, he studied Natural and Cultural Ecology, and fell in love with the power of the natural resources that we have on this planet. But since that was only the beginning, Uday Joshi decided to take his passion to Washington D.C., where he attended The American University. While there, he received a double major in Environmental Sciences and International Studies.


And then he discovered New Mexico, by going to the University of New Mexico. He graduated there with a master’s in Water Resources. He not only graduated, he graduated with distinction, an honor that not many have. He decided to continue on his education, and went to law school at the University of New Mexico School of Law in Albuquerque. He received his Juris Doctor, graduated with honors and awards, and went straight into helping out the water supply there in New Mexico.

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Joshi Massachusetts: New Mexico’s Water

Uday Joshi of New Mexico, DC and Massachusetts explores water usage, rights, and storage. He acts as a Hearing Examiner in the state of New Mexico after many years of gaining an education to refine his expertise in the subject. He received a master’s in Water Resources, which he graduated with honors in, and then got his Juris Doctor from the University of New Mexico. Over his career, he has focused on dilemmas with the water resources in the state of New Mexico, including watersheds, water rights, and water infrastructure and economic development. He specializes in areas of water security, and water development both in rural and urban water utilities.


Uday Joshi of Massachusetts currently resides in New Mexico and works hard at his job as the Hearing Examiner in Albuquerque. There, he specializes in the laws and policies associated with water development in that area. He understands the geology, hydrology, policy, and law that goes into water development, and can guarantee results for the desired goal. Still today, he continues to contribute to areas of water security, infrastructure, and investment in rural utilities for safe potable water. Uday Joshi is interested in modernizing the storage usage and how things are done on that front for a more efficient way of using that resource.


Uday Joshi has a passion for our natural resource of water, and we couldn’t have asked for a better guardian within the boundaries of New Mexico. He has studied various topics that surround the issues of water, and he specializes in issues such as watershed health, modernized water infrastructure, water delivery to rural communities, and the modernization of technology to help our water affect us in a more positive way.

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